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Genes 2018, 9(3), 119; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes9030119

Relating Stool Microbial Metabolite Levels, Inflammatory Markers and Dietary Behaviors to Screening Colonoscopy Findings in a Racially/Ethnically Diverse Patient Population

1
Department of Family Medicine Research Division, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160, USA
2
Department of Biostatistics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160, USA
3
Department of Surgery, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160, USA
4
Department of Dietetics and Nutrition, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160, USA
5
University of Kansas Cancer Center, Kansas City, KS 66160, USA
6
Department of Internal Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160, USA
Present address: American Academy of Family Physicians National Research Network, Leawood, KS 66211, USA.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 10 January 2018 / Revised: 9 February 2018 / Accepted: 20 February 2018 / Published: 26 February 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intestinal Microbes and Cancer)
Full-Text   |   PDF [356 KB, uploaded 26 February 2018]   |  

Abstract

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third leading cause of cancer death for both men and women in the United States, yet it is treatable and preventable. African Americans have higher incidence of CRC than other racial/ethnic groups, however, it is unclear whether this disparity is primarily due to environmental or biological factors. Short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are metabolites produced by bacteria in the colon and are known to be inversely related to CRC progression. The aim of this study is to investigate how stool SCFA levels, markers of inflammation in stool and dietary intake relate to colonoscopy findings in a diverse patient population. Stool samples from forty-eight participants were analyzed for SCFA levels and inflammatory markers (lysozyme, secretory IgA, lactoferrin). Additionally, participants completed the National Cancer Institute’s Diet History Questionnaire II (DHQ II) to report dietary intake over the past year. Subsequently, the majority of participants underwent screening colonoscopy. Our results showed that African Americans had higher total levels of SCFAs in stool than other racial/ethnic groups, significantly lower intake of non-starchy vegetables and similar inflammatory marker expression and colonoscopy outcomes, compared to others. This work is an initial exploration into the biological and clinical factors that may ultimately inform personalized screening approaches and clinical decision-making to improve colorectal cancer disparities for African Americans. View Full-Text
Keywords: colorectal cancer; short chain fatty acids; diet; inflammation; microbiota; health disparities; colonoscopy colorectal cancer; short chain fatty acids; diet; inflammation; microbiota; health disparities; colonoscopy
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Bridges, K.M.; Diaz, F.J.; Wang, Z.; Ahmed, I.; Sullivan, D.K.; Umar, S.; Buckles, D.C.; Greiner, K.A.; Hester, C.M. Relating Stool Microbial Metabolite Levels, Inflammatory Markers and Dietary Behaviors to Screening Colonoscopy Findings in a Racially/Ethnically Diverse Patient Population. Genes 2018, 9, 119.

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