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Agronomy 2018, 8(8), 152; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy8080152

Climate Change, Carbon Dioxide, and Pest Biology, Managing the Future: Coffee as a Case Study

1
Adaptive Cropping Systems Laboratory, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Agricultural Research Service (ARS), Beltsville, MD 20705, USA
2
Department of Environmental Conservation, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003, USA
3
Center for Invasive Species & Ecosystem Health, University of Georgia, Tifton, GA 31793, USA
4
Plant Pathology Department, Institute for Sustainable Food Systems, and Emerging Pathogens Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
5
Sustainable Perennial Crops Laboratory, United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, MD 20705, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 2 July 2018 / Revised: 14 August 2018 / Accepted: 15 August 2018 / Published: 17 August 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pest Management in Agroecosystems)
Full-Text   |   PDF [2681 KB, uploaded 17 August 2018]   |  

Abstract

The challenge of maintaining sufficient food, feed, fiber, and forests, for a projected end of century population of between 9–10 billion in the context of a climate averaging 2–4 °C warmer, is a global imperative. However, climate change is likely to alter the geographic ranges and impacts for a variety of insect pests, plant pathogens, and weeds, and the consequences for managed systems, particularly agriculture, remain uncertain. That uncertainty is related, in part, to whether pest management practices (e.g., biological, chemical, cultural, etc.) can adapt to climate/CO2 induced changes in pest biology to minimize potential loss. The ongoing and projected changes in CO2, environment, managed plant systems, and pest interactions, necessitates an assessment of current management practices and, if warranted, development of viable alternative strategies to counter damage from invasive alien species and evolving native pest populations. We provide an overview of the interactions regarding pest biology and climate/CO2; assess these interactions currently using coffee as a case study; identify the potential vulnerabilities regarding future pest impacts; and discuss possible adaptive strategies, including early detection and rapid response via EDDMapS (Early Detection & Distribution Mapping System), and integrated pest management (IPM), as adaptive means to improve monitoring pest movements and minimizing biotic losses while improving the efficacy of pest control. View Full-Text
Keywords: adaptation; crop protection; food security; global warming; insect-plant interactions; modelling; plant disease; range expansion; temperature adaptation; crop protection; food security; global warming; insect-plant interactions; modelling; plant disease; range expansion; temperature
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Ziska, L.H.; Bradley, B.A.; Wallace, R.D.; Bargeron, C.T.; LaForest, J.H.; Choudhury, R.A.; Garrett, K.A.; Vega, F.E. Climate Change, Carbon Dioxide, and Pest Biology, Managing the Future: Coffee as a Case Study. Agronomy 2018, 8, 152.

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