Special Issue "Pest Management in Agroecosystems"

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Soil and Plant Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 August 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Stephen L. Young

Crop and Soil Sciences Section, School of Integrative Plant Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 607-255-8879
Interests: weedy and invasive plants; robotics; conceptual modelling

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Pests continue to threaten agricultural production systems across the globe. The most effective management is that which accounts for the biological complexity of pests and the environmental conditions. Hence, sustainable pest management uses an agroecosystem approach where a variety of tools and tactics are employed to prevent harmful organisms, such as insects, weeds, and diseases, from surpassing economic thresholds.

In managing pests, the reliance on only one tool or tactic will cause a decrease in effectiveness and in some cases rendering it useless. Therefore, the most appropriate management must be based on a framework that is flexible, adaptable, and emphasizes balance. As such, all aspects of an agroecosystem contribute to sustainable pest management, including soil health, species diversity, and integration of practices.

This Special Issue will focus on “Pest Management in Agroecosystems.” We welcome novel research, reviews and opinion pieces covering all related topics of the food, feed, and fiber production system. In addition, papers that address management solutions, model concepts, highlight case-studies from the field, and document policy positions, are also encouraged.

Prof. Dr. Stephen L. Young
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agronomy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biodiversity
  • Biological control
  • Mechanical control
  • Cultural control
  • Chemical control
  • Integrated pest management
  • Technology

Published Papers (4 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-4
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle The Effect of Barley Cover Crop Residue and Herbicide Management on the Foliar Arthropod Community in No-Till Soybeans
Received: 10 May 2018 / Revised: 11 May 2018 / Accepted: 30 May 2018 / Published: 1 June 2018
PDF Full-text (578 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Cover cropping has long been used as a method of reducing soil erosion, increasing soil quality, and suppressing weeds. However, the effects of cover crops in local farming systems are varied and can be affected by timing and method of termination. Field experiments
[...] Read more.
Cover cropping has long been used as a method of reducing soil erosion, increasing soil quality, and suppressing weeds. However, the effects of cover crops in local farming systems are varied and can be affected by timing and method of termination. Field experiments were conducted at two sites in Maryland, USA during the 2013 and 2014 growing seasons to examine how varying the date and method of terminating a barley (Hordeum vulgare) cover crop affects the arthropod communities in succeeding no-till soybean (Glycine max). Experimental treatments included early-kill with pre- and post-emergent herbicides (EK), late-kill with pre- and post-emergent herbicides (LK), late-kill with a flail mower and pre-emergent herbicide (FM), and a fallow/bare-ground check with pre- and post-emergent herbicides (BG). Terminating barley late, just prior to soybean planting, resulted in significantly greater biomass accumulation in LK and FM than EK. However, method and timing of termination had no effect on the community of pest and beneficial arthropods in the soybean canopy. Results from this experiment suggest that terminating the cover crop early or late (just prior to crop planting) or using a mower or post-emergent herbicide will result in a similar community of arthropods within the soybean canopy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pest Management in Agroecosystems)
Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Climate Change, Carbon Dioxide, and Pest Biology, Managing the Future: Coffee as a Case Study
Agronomy 2018, 8(8), 152; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy8080152
Received: 2 July 2018 / Revised: 14 August 2018 / Accepted: 15 August 2018 / Published: 17 August 2018
PDF Full-text (2681 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The challenge of maintaining sufficient food, feed, fiber, and forests, for a projected end of century population of between 9–10 billion in the context of a climate averaging 2–4 °C warmer, is a global imperative. However, climate change is likely to alter the
[...] Read more.
The challenge of maintaining sufficient food, feed, fiber, and forests, for a projected end of century population of between 9–10 billion in the context of a climate averaging 2–4 °C warmer, is a global imperative. However, climate change is likely to alter the geographic ranges and impacts for a variety of insect pests, plant pathogens, and weeds, and the consequences for managed systems, particularly agriculture, remain uncertain. That uncertainty is related, in part, to whether pest management practices (e.g., biological, chemical, cultural, etc.) can adapt to climate/CO2 induced changes in pest biology to minimize potential loss. The ongoing and projected changes in CO2, environment, managed plant systems, and pest interactions, necessitates an assessment of current management practices and, if warranted, development of viable alternative strategies to counter damage from invasive alien species and evolving native pest populations. We provide an overview of the interactions regarding pest biology and climate/CO2; assess these interactions currently using coffee as a case study; identify the potential vulnerabilities regarding future pest impacts; and discuss possible adaptive strategies, including early detection and rapid response via EDDMapS (Early Detection & Distribution Mapping System), and integrated pest management (IPM), as adaptive means to improve monitoring pest movements and minimizing biotic losses while improving the efficacy of pest control. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pest Management in Agroecosystems)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperReview Agriculture’s Moral Dilemmas and the Need for Agroecology
Agronomy 2018, 8(7), 116; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy8070116
Received: 13 June 2018 / Revised: 2 July 2018 / Accepted: 7 July 2018 / Published: 10 July 2018
PDF Full-text (193 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Those engaged in agriculture possess a definite but unexamined moral confidence or certainty about the correctness of what they do. The basis of the moral confidence is not obvious to those who have it, or to the public. In fact, the moral confidence
[...] Read more.
Those engaged in agriculture possess a definite but unexamined moral confidence or certainty about the correctness of what they do. The basis of the moral confidence is not obvious to those who have it, or to the public. In fact, the moral confidence that pervades agriculture is potentially harmful because it is unexamined. It is necessary that those engaged in agriculture analyze what it is about agriculture in society that favors, inhibits, or limits agriculture. All should strive to nourish and strengthen the aspects of agriculture that are beneficial and change those that are not. To do this all must be confident to study ourselves, our institutions, and be dedicated to the task of modifying the values and goals of both. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pest Management in Agroecosystems)
Open AccessReview Challenges and Prospects for Building Resilient Disease Management Strategies and Tactics for the New York Table Beet Industry
Agronomy 2018, 8(7), 112; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy8070112
Received: 15 June 2018 / Revised: 28 June 2018 / Accepted: 2 July 2018 / Published: 4 July 2018
PDF Full-text (4040 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The New York table beet industry is expanding and has unique challenges to minimize crop loss in both conventional and organic production. Diseases may reduce plant population density and increase heterogeneity in a stand, reduce the duration of time foliage is healthy, and
[...] Read more.
The New York table beet industry is expanding and has unique challenges to minimize crop loss in both conventional and organic production. Diseases may reduce plant population density and increase heterogeneity in a stand, reduce the duration of time foliage is healthy, and decrease the yield of marketable roots. Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn and Pythiumultimum Trow are dominant in the pathogen complex affecting crop stand and root health. Cercospora leaf spot (CLS) caused by the fungus, Cercospora beticola Sacc., is a highly destructive disease affecting foliar health. In conventional table beet production, fungicides are applied in-furrow and at emergence for early season and root disease control, and applied to foliage periodically thereafter for foliar disease control. Resistance within C. beticola populations to single-site mode-of-action fungicides poses the most significant threat to the resilience of conventional disease management. An integrated approach to reduce pesticide application when not economically warranted (i.e., a false positive) is urgently required. For foliar disease, improved scheduling of fungicides may reduce usage without loss of disease control. For soilborne diseases, pre-plant quantification of soilborne inoculum may support the selection of fields with lower inoculum densities to minimize risk of early season and root disease. For organic production, some approved products have moderate efficacy for foliar disease control, but strategies to reduce inoculum and select fields at lowest risk of disease will be paramount. Crop rotation has shown promise for disease management, but broad host range of several of the major soilborne pathogens limits the utility of this method in the production region. Enhanced knowledge of cultivar susceptibility to local populations of fungal pathogens responsible for foliar and root diseases is paramount, and adoption of commercially acceptable cultivars with improved resistance to CLS and Rhizoctonia crown and root rot has potential to transform disease management strategies for the New York table beet industry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pest Management in Agroecosystems)
Figures

Figure 1

Back to Top