Next Article in Journal
Understanding Starch Structure: Recent Progress
Previous Article in Journal
Combination of Lactic Acid-Based Deep Eutectic Solvents (DES) with β-Cyclodextrin: Performance Screening Using Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction of Polyphenols from Selected Native Greek Medicinal Plants
Previous Article in Special Issue
The Effect of Organic and Inorganic Fertilizers on the Yield of Two Contrasting Soybean Varieties and Residual Nutrient Effects on a Subsequent Finger Millet Crop
Article Menu
Issue 3 (September) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Agronomy 2017, 7(3), 55; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy7030055

Impacts of Fertilization Type on Soil Microbial Biomass and Nutrient Availability in Two Agroecological Zones of Ghana

1
United Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Saiwaicho 3-5-8, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8509, Japan
2
Institute of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Saiwaicho 3-5-8, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8509, Japan
3
Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research, Institute of Land Use Systems, Eberswalder str. 84, 15374 Muncheberg, Germany
4
Humboldt University of Berlin, Faculty of Life Science, Institute of Agriculture and Horticulture, Division of Land Use Systems, Albrecht-Thaer-Weg 5, 14195 Berlin, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Ilan Stavi
Received: 11 July 2017 / Revised: 12 August 2017 / Accepted: 16 August 2017 / Published: 21 August 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustaining soil functions in agro-ecosystems)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [2483 KB, uploaded 21 August 2017]   |  

Abstract

The decline in soil productivity amidst efforts to increase crop yield in Sub Saharan Africa (SSA) has made it imperative to assess the current fertilization management approaches. This study was conducted in two agroecological zones (i.e., Guinea Savannah (GS) and Deciduous forest (DF)) of Ghana to evaluate how different fertilization schemes in the long term (>5 years) impacted the soil biochemical properties. Soil samples under four fertilization schemes (inorganic fertilizer only, low-to-medium organic residues only, inorganic fertilizers plus low-to-medium organic residues, and no fertilization) from 20 farmers’ field were sampled from March to April 2015. Soil biochemical quality indicators were determined using standard procedures. Overall, the average chemical and microbial biomass contents for most indicators were significantly higher in DF compared to GS. Relative to the reference sites, soil quality improvement were observed under inorganic fertilization in both agroecologies in contrast to significant soil deterioration (26.5%) under sole organic residue application in GS. Furthermore, the results showed that increased inorganic fertilization rate alone or combination with organic residues improved soil quality relative to the reference. The present results suggest the need to raise the current fertilizer application rates, especially in GS in order to enhance optimum soil productivity. View Full-Text
Keywords: deciduous forest; deterioration index; guinea savannah; inorganic; microbial biomass; organic; tropical agroecological zone deciduous forest; deterioration index; guinea savannah; inorganic; microbial biomass; organic; tropical agroecological zone
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Omari, R.A.; Sarkodee-Addo, E.; Fujii, Y.; Oikawa, Y.; Bellingrath-Kimura, S.D. Impacts of Fertilization Type on Soil Microbial Biomass and Nutrient Availability in Two Agroecological Zones of Ghana. Agronomy 2017, 7, 55.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Agronomy EISSN 2073-4395 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top