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Agronomy 2015, 5(3), 291-308; doi:10.3390/agronomy5030291

Response of Snap Bean Cultivars to Rhizobium Inoculation under Dryland Agriculture in Ethiopia

1
Department of Plant Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, 51 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A8, Canada
2
School of Plant and Horticultural Sciences, Hawassa University, Hawassa, Ethiopia
3
Department of Soil Science, University of Saskatchewan, 51 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A8, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Yantai Gan
Received: 7 May 2015 / Revised: 20 June 2015 / Accepted: 30 June 2015 / Published: 2 July 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Agronomy with Impact for Food Security)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [17153 KB, uploaded 2 July 2015]   |  

Abstract

High yield in snap bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production requires relatively high nitrogen (N) inputs. However, little information is available on whether the use of rhizobial inoculants for enhanced biological dinitrogen fixation can provide adequate N to support green pod yield. The objectives of this study were to test the use of rhizobia inoculation as an alternative N source for snap bean production under rain fed conditions, and to identify suitable cultivars and appropriate agro-ecology for high pod yield and N2 fixation in Ethiopia. The study was conducted in 2011 and 2012 during the main rainy season at three locations. The treatments were factorial combinations of three N treatments (0 and 100 kg·N·ha−1, and Rhizobium etli (HB 429)) and eight snap bean cultivars. Rhizobial inoculation and applied N increased the total yield of snap bean pod by 18% and 42%, respectively. Cultivar Melkassa 1 was the most suitable for a reduced input production system due to its greatest N2 fixation and high pod yield. The greatest amount of fixed N was found at Debre Zeit location. We concluded that N2 fixation achieved through rhizobial inoculation can support the production of snap bean under rain fed conditions in Ethiopia. View Full-Text
Keywords: snap bean; Rhizobium; nitrogen fixation; 15N; Dryland Agriculture snap bean; Rhizobium; nitrogen fixation; 15N; Dryland Agriculture
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Beshir, H.M.; Walley, F.L.; Bueckert, R.; Tar'an, B. Response of Snap Bean Cultivars to Rhizobium Inoculation under Dryland Agriculture in Ethiopia. Agronomy 2015, 5, 291-308.

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