Next Issue
Previous Issue

E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Table of Contents

Polymers, Volume 2, Issue 2 (June 2010), Pages 31-101

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-5
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Thermal-Mechanical Properties of Polyurethane-Clay Shape Memory Polymer Nanocomposites
Polymers 2010, 2(2), 31-39; doi:10.3390/polym2020031
Received: 15 January 2010 / Revised: 15 April 2010 / Accepted: 22 April 2010 / Published: 26 April 2010
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (1644 KB)
Abstract
Shape memory nanocomposites of polyurethane (PU)-clay were fabricated by melt mixing of PU and nano-clay. Based on nano-indentation and microhardness tests, the strength of the nanocomposites increased dramatically as a function of clay content, which is attributed to the enhanced nanoclay–polymer interactions. Thermal
[...] Read more.
Shape memory nanocomposites of polyurethane (PU)-clay were fabricated by melt mixing of PU and nano-clay. Based on nano-indentation and microhardness tests, the strength of the nanocomposites increased dramatically as a function of clay content, which is attributed to the enhanced nanoclay–polymer interactions. Thermal mechanical experiments demonstrated good mechanical and shape memory effects of the nanocomposites. Full shape memory recovery was displayed by both the pure PU and PU-clay nanocomposites. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Stimuli-Responsive (co)Polymers)
Open AccessArticle Synthesis of Environmentally Responsive Polymers by Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization: Generation of Reversible Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Surfaces
Polymers 2010, 2(2), 40-56; doi:10.3390/polym2020040
Received: 4 January 2010 / Revised: 11 March 2010 / Accepted: 27 April 2010 / Published: 12 May 2010
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (1053 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Environmentally responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) brushes were grafted from the surface of polymer particles or flat surfaces in order to generate reversible hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. The use of atom transfer radical polymerization was demonstrated for the grafting of polymer brushes as it
[...] Read more.
Environmentally responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) brushes were grafted from the surface of polymer particles or flat surfaces in order to generate reversible hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. The use of atom transfer radical polymerization was demonstrated for the grafting of polymer brushes as it allows efficient control on the amount of grafted polymer. The polymer particles were generated with or without surfactant in the emulsion polymerization and their surface could be modified with the atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiator. The uniform functionalization of the surface with ATRP initiator was responsible for the uniform grafting of polymer brushes. The grafted brushes responded reversibly with changes in temperature indicating that the reversible responsive behavior could be translated to the particle surfaces. The particles were observed to adsorb and desorb protein and virus molecules by changing the temperatures below or higher than 32 °C. The initiator functionalized particles could also be adsorbed on the flat surfaces. The adsorption process also required optimization of the heat treatment conditions to form a uniform layer of the particles on the substrate. The grafted polymer brushes also responded to the changes in temperatures similar to the spherical particles studied through water droplets placed on the flat substrates. Full article
Open AccessArticle Shape-Memory Properties of Segmented Polymers Containing Aramid Hard Segments and Polycaprolactone Soft Segments
Polymers 2010, 2(2), 71-85; doi:10.3390/polym2020071
Received: 27 April 2010 / Revised: 28 May 2010 / Accepted: 28 May 2010 / Published: 8 June 2010
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (880 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
A series of segmented multiblock copolymers containing aramid hard segments and extended polycaprolactone soft segments (with an Mn of 4,200 or 8,200 g mol–1) was prepared and tested for their shape-memory properties. Chain extenders were essential to raise the hard
[...] Read more.
A series of segmented multiblock copolymers containing aramid hard segments and extended polycaprolactone soft segments (with an Mn of 4,200 or 8,200 g mol–1) was prepared and tested for their shape-memory properties. Chain extenders were essential to raise the hard segment concentration so that an extended rubbery plateau could be observed. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis provided a useful guide in identifying (i) the presence of a rubbery plateau, (ii) the flow temperature, and (iii) the temperature when samples started to deform irreversibly. Full article
Figures

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Biological and Biomimetic Comb Polyelectrolytes
Polymers 2010, 2(2), 57-70; doi:10.3390/polym2020057
Received: 6 May 2010 / Revised: 19 May 2010 / Accepted: 23 May 2010 / Published: 26 May 2010
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (191 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Some new phenomena involved in the physical properties of comb polyelectrolyte solutions are reviewed. Special emphasis is given to synthetic biomimetic materials, and the structures formed by these molecules are compared with those of naturally occurring glycoprotein and proteoglycan solutions. Developments in the
[...] Read more.
Some new phenomena involved in the physical properties of comb polyelectrolyte solutions are reviewed. Special emphasis is given to synthetic biomimetic materials, and the structures formed by these molecules are compared with those of naturally occurring glycoprotein and proteoglycan solutions. Developments in the determination of the structure and dynamics (viscoelasticity) of comb polymers in solution are also covered. Specifically the appearance of multi-globular structures, helical instabilities, liquid crystalline phases, and the self-assembly of the materials to produce hierarchical comb morphologies is examined. Comb polyelectrolytes are surface active and a short review is made of some recent experiments in this area that relate to their morphology when suspended in solution. We hope to emphasize the wide variety of phenomena demonstrated by the vast range of naturally occurring comb polyelectrolytes and the challenges presented to synthetic chemists designing biomimetic materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polyelectrolytes)
Figures

Open AccessReview Intelligent Polymeric Nanocarriers Responding to Physical or Biological Signals: A New Paradigm of Cytosolic Drug Delivery for Tumor Treatment
Polymers 2010, 2(2), 86-101; doi:10.3390/polym2020086
Received: 28 April 2010 / Revised: 2 June 2010 / Accepted: 18 June 2010 / Published: 22 June 2010
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (664 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The physicochemical properties of stimuli-responsive polymers change with physical or biological signals, such as pH, enzyme concentrations, and temperature. These polymers have attracted considerable attention in the field of drug delivery. The drug carrier system, which was revolutionized by the introduction of these
[...] Read more.
The physicochemical properties of stimuli-responsive polymers change with physical or biological signals, such as pH, enzyme concentrations, and temperature. These polymers have attracted considerable attention in the field of drug delivery. The drug carrier system, which was revolutionized by the introduction of these polymers, has recently provided a new paradigm of maximizing the therapeutic activity of drugs. This review highlights recent studies regarding stimuli-responsive drug carriers tailor-made for effective cytosolic drug delivery, with particular emphasis on tumor treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Stimuli-Responsive (co)Polymers)
Figures

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Polymers Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
polymers@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Polymers
Back to Top