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Polymers, Volume 2, Issue 1 (March 2010), Pages 1-30

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial Polymers: An Interdisciplinary Open Access Journal
Polymers 2010, 2(1), 1-2; doi:10.3390/polym2010001
Received: 10 January 2010 / Published: 12 January 2010
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Abstract
During the last 60 years, the field of Macromolecular Science has broadened significantly and macromolecular or polymeric materials today constitute the most important class of materials. More than any other class of materials, polymers have revolutionized and enabled various technology platforms. The [...] Read more.
During the last 60 years, the field of Macromolecular Science has broadened significantly and macromolecular or polymeric materials today constitute the most important class of materials. More than any other class of materials, polymers have revolutionized and enabled various technology platforms. The versatility in applications ranges from major structural components (the Airbus A380-800 or the Boeing 787 are built from 80% carbon fiber reinforced thermoset by volume) to high value added ingredients on the scale of grams as for use in lithography or drug delivery. Key to these systems is the direct control of the physical properties of the polymeric constituents, which in turn reflects fundamental advances in fields, including (i) polymerization methods, (ii) theory, simulation, and modeling, (iii) understanding of new physical phenomena, (iv) advances in characterization techniques, and (v) harnessing of self-assembly and biological strategies for producing complex multifunctional structures. Research activity in the field of Macromolecular Science continues to expand and attracts scientists from many other disciplines. [...] Full article

Review

Jump to: Editorial

Open AccessReview Hybrid Lattice Particle Modelling Approach for Polymeric Materials Subject to High Strain Rate Loads
Polymers 2010, 2(1), 3-30; doi:10.3390/polym2010003
Received: 25 February 2010 / Revised: 23 March 2010 / Accepted: 23 March 2010 / Published: 25 March 2010
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (1784 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Hybrid Lattice Particle modelling (HLPM) is an innovative particular dynamics approach that is established based on a combination of the particle modelling (PM) technique together with the conventional lattice modelling (LM) theory. It is developed for the purpose of simulating the dynamic [...] Read more.
Hybrid Lattice Particle modelling (HLPM) is an innovative particular dynamics approach that is established based on a combination of the particle modelling (PM) technique together with the conventional lattice modelling (LM) theory. It is developed for the purpose of simulating the dynamic fragmentation of solids under high strain rate loadings at macroscales with a varying Poisson's ratio. HLPM is conceptually illustrated by fully dynamic particles (or “quasi-particles”) placed at the nodes of a lattice network without explicitly considering their geometric size. The interaction potentials among the particles can employ either linear (quadratic) or nonlinear (Leonard-Jones or strain rate dependent polynomial) type as the axial/angular linkage. The defined spring constants are then mapped into lattice system, which are in turn matched with the material’s continuum-level elastic moduli, strength, Poisson's ratio and mass density. As an accurate dynamic fracture solver of materials, HLPM has its unique advantages over the other numerical techniques which are mainly characterized as easy preparation of inputs, high computation efficiency, ability of post-fracture simulation and a multiscale model, etc., This paper is to review the successful HLPM studies of dynamic fragmentation of polymeric materials with good accuracy. Polymeric materials, including nylon 6-6, vinyl ester and epoxy, are accounted for under the loading conditions of tension, indentation and punctuation. In addition, HLPM of wave propagation and wave induced fracture study is also reviewed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Stimuli-Responsive (co)Polymers)

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