Next Article in Journal
Cardiometabolic and Skeletal Risk Factors in Black Men with Prostate Cancer Starting Androgen Deprivation Therapy
Next Article in Special Issue
Sarcoidosis in Melanoma Patients: Case Report and Literature Review
Previous Article in Journal
PP2A: The Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing?
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Cancers 2015, 7(2), 670-678; doi:10.3390/cancers7020670

A Possible Association between Melanoma and Prostate Cancer. Results from a Case-Control-Study

1
School of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, CA 92093, USA
2
Mohs Micrographic and Dermatologic Surgery, University of California, San Diego, CA 92122, USA
3
Department of Dermatology, University of California, San Diego, CA 92122, USA
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Chyi-Chia Richard Lee
Received: 5 February 2015 / Revised: 16 March 2015 / Accepted: 25 March 2015 / Published: 15 April 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Topics in Cutaneous Melanoma)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [259 KB, uploaded 15 April 2015]   |  

Abstract

Melanoma and prostate cancer are the fifth and first most common cancers in men within the United States, respectively. The association between the two cancers lies in the mutual androgen-dependence. However, the relationship between prostate cancer history and melanoma development remains to be further elucidated. We aim to determine the odds of history of prostate cancer among men with melanoma as compared to time-frame, clinic, and provider-matched controls without melanoma within a single academic surgical center. We present a case-control study comparing men treated for melanoma and non-melanoma cancer by a single provider between 2010 and 2014 within an academic dermatologic surgical center. Overall, there were nine cases of prostate cancer among the melanoma group and two cases amongst the controls—a statistically significant difference in both uni- and multivariable analyses (p = 0.057 [95% CI 1, 23.5], p = 0.042 [95% CI 1.1, 129], respectively). Body mass index, alcohol use, and skin type II were significant risk factors for melanoma (p = 0.011 [95% CI 1, 1.3], 0.005 [95% CI 1.4, 7], 0.025 [95% CI 1.1, 3.3], respectively). There were more immunosuppressed controls (p = 0.002); however, the melanoma patients had a significantly longer duration of immunosuppression (11.6 vs. 1.9 years, p < 0.001 [95% CI 0.03, 0.5]). Melanoma screenings for men should include questions on prostate cancer history. Prostate cancer patients may benefit from more frequent and comprehensive melanoma screening. View Full-Text
Keywords: melanoma; men; prevention; prostate cancer; screening melanoma; men; prevention; prostate cancer; screening
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Goldenberg, A.; Jiang, S.I.B.; Cohen, P.R. A Possible Association between Melanoma and Prostate Cancer. Results from a Case-Control-Study. Cancers 2015, 7, 670-678.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Cancers EISSN 2072-6694 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top