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Micromachines 2017, 8(12), 359; doi:10.3390/mi8120359

Extending the Limits of Wireless Power Transfer to Miniaturized Implantable Electronic Devices

CMEMS, University of Minho, 4800-058 Guimar√£es, Portugal
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Received: 8 November 2017 / Revised: 2 December 2017 / Accepted: 6 December 2017 / Published: 12 December 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wireless Microdevices and Systems for Biomedical Applications)
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Abstract

Implantable electronic devices have been evolving at an astonishing pace, due to the development of fabrication techniques and consequent miniaturization, and a higher efficiency of sensors, actuators, processors and packaging. Implantable devices, with sensing, communication, actuation, and wireless power are of high demand, as they pave the way for new applications and therapies. Long-term and reliable powering of such devices has been a challenge since they were first introduced. This paper presents a review of representative state of the art implantable electronic devices, with wireless power capabilities, ranging from inductive coupling to ultrasounds. The different power transmission mechanisms are compared, to show that, without new methodologies, the power that can be safely transmitted to an implant is reaching its limit. Consequently, a new approach, capable of multiplying the available power inside a brain phantom for the same specific absorption rate (SAR) value, is proposed. In this paper, a setup was implemented to quadruple the power available in the implant, without breaking the SAR limits. A brain phantom was used for concept verification, with both simulation and measurement data. View Full-Text
Keywords: wireless power transfer; inductive coupling; midfield; far-field; ultrasound; biological energy harvesting wireless power transfer; inductive coupling; midfield; far-field; ultrasound; biological energy harvesting
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Dinis, H.; Colmiais, I.; Mendes, P.M. Extending the Limits of Wireless Power Transfer to Miniaturized Implantable Electronic Devices. Micromachines 2017, 8, 359.

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