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Toxins 2016, 8(1), 27; doi:10.3390/toxins8010027

Preventive Effects of Bee Venom Derived Phospholipase A2 on Oxaliplatin-Induced Neuropathic Pain in Mice

1
Department of Physiology, College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdamoon-gu, Seoul 130-701, Korea
2
Department of East-West Medicine, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdamoon-gu, Seoul 130-701, Korea
3
Department of Clinical Korean Medicine, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdamoon-gu, Seoul 130-701, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Glenn F. King
Received: 5 December 2015 / Revised: 12 January 2016 / Accepted: 14 January 2016 / Published: 19 January 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Arthropod Venoms)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [6088 KB, uploaded 19 January 2016]   |  

Abstract

Oxaliplatin, a chemotherapy drug used to treat colorectal cancer, induces specific sensory neurotoxicity signs that are aggravated by cold and mechanical stimuli. Here we examined the preventive effects of Bee Venom (BV) derived phospholipase A2 (bvPLA2) on oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain in mice and its immunological mechanism. The cold and mechanical allodynia signs were evaluated by acetone and von Frey hair test on the hind paw, respectively. The most significant allodynia signs were observed at three days after an injection of oxaliplatin (6 mg/kg, i.p.) and then decreased gradually to a normal level on days 7–9. The oxaliplatin injection also induced infiltration of macrophages and upregulated levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β in the lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Daily treatment with bvPLA2 (0.2 mg/kg, i.p.) for five consecutive days prior to the oxaliplatin injection markedly inhibited the development of cold and mechanical allodynia, and suppressed infiltration of macrophages and the increase of IL-1β level in the DRG. Such preventive effects of bvPLA2 were completely blocked by depleting regulatory T cells (Tregs) with CD25 antibody pre-treatments. These results suggest that bvPLA2 may prevent oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain by suppressing immune responses in the DRG by Tregs. View Full-Text
Keywords: bee venom derived phospholipase A2; oxaliplatin; neuropathic pain; regulatory T cells; dorsal root ganglia bee venom derived phospholipase A2; oxaliplatin; neuropathic pain; regulatory T cells; dorsal root ganglia
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Li, D.; Kim, W.; Shin, D.; Jung, Y.; Bae, H.; Kim, S.K. Preventive Effects of Bee Venom Derived Phospholipase A2 on Oxaliplatin-Induced Neuropathic Pain in Mice. Toxins 2016, 8, 27.

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