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Nutrients 2017, 9(9), 988; doi:10.3390/nu9090988

Influence of Skeletal Muscle Carnosine Content on Fatigue during Repeated Resistance Exercise in Recreationally Active Women

1
Institute of Exercise Physiology and Wellness, Educational and Human Sciences, Sport and Exercise Science, University of Central Florida, 12494 University Blvd., Orlando, FL 32816, USA
2
Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 8 August 2017 / Revised: 1 September 2017 / Accepted: 4 September 2017 / Published: 7 September 2017
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Abstract

Carnosine is a naturally occurring intramuscular dipeptide that is thought to attenuate fatigue during high-intensity exercise. Carnosine content is influenced by various factors, including gender and diet. Despite research reporting that carnosine content is lower in women compared to men and lower in vegetarians compared to omnivores, no investigations have examined carnosine content in women based on dietary protein intake and its effect on muscle fatigue. Twenty recreationally active women were assigned to either a high (HI; n = 5), moderate (MOD; n = 10), or low (LO; n = 5) group based upon intramuscular carnosine content of the vastus lateralis. Each participant underwent two unilateral maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC) of the knee extensors separated by an isokinetic exercise protocol consisting of five sets of 50 repeated maximal unilateral contractions. Magnitude-based inferences were used to analyze group differences. Percent decline in rate of force development and peak torque (PT) during the MVICs and changes in PT and mean torque during the muscle-fatiguing protocol were lower in HI compared to both MOD and LO. Additionally, absolute and relative dietary protein intake were greater in HI compared to MOD or LO. Results indicated that greater intramuscular carnosine content was reflective of greater dietary protein intake and that individuals with higher carnosine content displayed a greater attenuation of fatigue compared to those with lower carnosine. View Full-Text
Keywords: intracellular buffering capacity; muscular acidosis; fatigue; dietary protein intake; histidine dipeptides intracellular buffering capacity; muscular acidosis; fatigue; dietary protein intake; histidine dipeptides
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Varanoske, A.N.; Hoffman, J.R.; Church, D.D.; Wang, R.; Baker, K.M.; Dodd, S.J.; Coker, N.A.; Oliveira, L.P.; Dawson, V.L.; Fukuda, D.H.; Stout, J.R. Influence of Skeletal Muscle Carnosine Content on Fatigue during Repeated Resistance Exercise in Recreationally Active Women. Nutrients 2017, 9, 988.

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