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Nutrients 2017, 9(9), 942; doi:10.3390/nu9090942

Food Consumption Patterns among U.S. Children from Birth to 23 Months of Age, 2009–2014

1
National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, GA 30341, USA
2
National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Hyattsville, MD 20782, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 7 July 2017 / Revised: 8 August 2017 / Accepted: 23 August 2017 / Published: 26 August 2017
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [210 KB, uploaded 26 August 2017]

Abstract

Early dietary patterns can have long-term health consequences. This study describes food consumption patterns among US children ≤23 months. We used one 24 h dietary recall from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009–2014 to estimate the percentage of children ≤23 months who consumed selected food/beverage categories on any given day by age and race/Hispanic origin. Among 0 to 5 month olds, 42.9% (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 37.0%, 49.1%) consumed breast milk, with non-Hispanic blacks less likely (21.2%, 95% CI: 13.2%, 32.2%) compared with non-Hispanic whites (49.0%, 95% CI: 39.0%, 59.1%) (p < 0.001). The percentage of children consuming vegetables was 57.4%, 48.2%, and 45.1% for ages 6 to 11, 12 to 18 and 19 to 23 months, respectively (p < 0.01 for trend). The percentage of children consuming sugar-sweetened beverages was 6.6%, 31.8% and 38.3% for ages 6 to 11, 12 to 18 and 19 to 23 months, respectively (p < 0.01 for trend). Among children aged ≥6 months, lower percentages of non-Hispanic black and Hispanic children consumed vegetables, and higher percentages consumed sugar-sweetened beverages and 100% juice compared with non-Hispanic white children, although differences were not always statistically significant. Compared with children in the second year of life, a higher percentage of children 6 to 11 months of age consumed vegetables and a lower percentage consumed 100% juice, sugar-sweetened beverages, snacks, or sweets; with differences by race/Hispanic origin. These data may be relevant to the upcoming 2020–2025 federal dietary guidelines. View Full-Text
Keywords: young children; food consumption patterns; NHANES; sugar-sweetened beverages; fruit and vegetables; race/Hispanic origin young children; food consumption patterns; NHANES; sugar-sweetened beverages; fruit and vegetables; race/Hispanic origin
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Hamner, H.C.; Perrine, C.G.; Gupta, P.M.; Herrick, K.A.; Cogswell, M.E. Food Consumption Patterns among U.S. Children from Birth to 23 Months of Age, 2009–2014. Nutrients 2017, 9, 942.

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