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Nutrients 2017, 9(8), 885; doi:10.3390/nu9080885

Dietary Fructose Enhances the Ability of Low Concentrations of Angiotensin II to Stimulate Proximal Tubule Na+ Reabsorption

1
Department of Physiology and Biophysics, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA
2
Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires C1113AAD, Argentina
3
Facultad de Medicina, Departamento de Ciencias Fisiológicas, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires C1121ABG, Argentina
4
Current Address: Miromatrix Medical Inc., 10399 W 70th St, Eden Prairie, MN 55344, USA
5
Instituto de Química y Fisicoquímica Biológicas, CONICET, Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires C1113AAD, Argentina
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 28 June 2017 / Revised: 10 August 2017 / Accepted: 11 August 2017 / Published: 16 August 2017
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Abstract

Fructose-enriched diets cause salt-sensitive hypertension. Proximal tubules (PTs) reabsorb 70% of the water and salt filtered through the glomerulus. Angiotensin II (Ang II) regulates this process. Normally, dietary salt reduces Ang II allowing the kidney to excrete more salt, thereby preventing hypertension. We hypothesized that fructose-enriched diets enhance the ability of low concentrations of Ang II to stimulate PT transport. We measured the effects of a low concentration of Ang II (10−12 mol/L) on transport-related oxygen consumption (QO2), and Na/K-ATPase and Na/H-exchange (NHE) activities and expression in PTs from rats consuming tap water (Control) or 20% fructose (FRUC). In FRUC-treated PTs, Ang II increased QO2 by 14.9 ± 1.3 nmol/mg/min (p < 0.01) but had no effect in Controls. FRUC elevated NHE3 expression by 19 ± 3% (p < 0.004) but not Na/K-ATPase expression. Ang II stimulated NHE activity in FRUC PT (Δ + 0.7 ± 0.1 Arbitrary Fluorescent units (AFU)/s, p < 0.01) but not in Controls. Na/K-ATPase activity was not affected. The PKC inhibitor Gö6976 blocked the ability of FRUC to augment the actions of Ang II. FRUC did not alter the inhibitory effect of dopamine on NHE activity. We conclude that dietary fructose increases the ability of low concentrations of Ang II to stimulate PT Na reabsorption via effects on NHE. View Full-Text
Keywords: kidney; hypertension; sodium transport; salt sensitivity kidney; hypertension; sodium transport; salt sensitivity
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MDPI and ACS Style

Gonzalez-Vicente, A.; Cabral, P.D.; Hong, N.J.; Asirwatham, J.; Yang, N.; Berthiaume, J.M.; Dominici, F.P.; Garvin, J.L. Dietary Fructose Enhances the Ability of Low Concentrations of Angiotensin II to Stimulate Proximal Tubule Na+ Reabsorption. Nutrients 2017, 9, 885.

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