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Nutrients 2017, 9(8), 807; doi:10.3390/nu9080807

Consuming Almonds vs. Isoenergetic Baked Food Does Not Differentially Influence Postprandial Appetite or Neural Reward Responses to Visual Food Stimuli

1
Anschutz Health and Wellness Center, University of Colorado—Denver, Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO 80045, USA
2
Department of Nutrition Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA
3
Department of Molecular Cell Biology, University of California, Merced, CA 95343, USA
4
Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA
5
Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes, Department of Medicine, University of Colorado—Denver, Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO 80045, USA
6
Department of Statistics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 26 June 2017 / Revised: 20 July 2017 / Accepted: 24 July 2017 / Published: 27 July 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nut Consumption for Human Health)
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Abstract

Nuts have high energy and fat contents, but nut intake does not promote weight gain or obesity, which may be partially explained by their proposed high satiety value. The primary aim of this study was to assess the effects of consuming almonds versus a baked food on postprandial appetite and neural responses to visual food stimuli. Twenty-two adults (19 women and 3 men) with a BMI between 25 and 40 kg/m2 completed the current study during a 12-week behavioral weight loss intervention. Participants consumed either 28 g of whole, lightly salted roasted almonds or a serving of a baked food with equivalent energy and macronutrient contents in random order on two testing days prior to and at the end of the intervention. Pre- and postprandial appetite ratings and functional magnetic resonance imaging scans were completed on all four testing days. Postprandial hunger, desire to eat, fullness, and neural responses to visual food stimuli were not different following consumption of almonds and the baked food, nor were they influenced by weight loss. These results support energy and macronutrient contents as principal determinants of postprandial appetite and do not support a unique satiety effect of almonds independent of these variables. View Full-Text
Keywords: almonds; fMRI; reward; appetite; obesity almonds; fMRI; reward; appetite; obesity
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Sayer, R.D.; Dhillon, J.; Tamer, G.G.; Cornier, M.-A.; Chen, N.; Wright, A.J.; Campbell, W.W.; Mattes, R.D. Consuming Almonds vs. Isoenergetic Baked Food Does Not Differentially Influence Postprandial Appetite or Neural Reward Responses to Visual Food Stimuli. Nutrients 2017, 9, 807.

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