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Nutrients 2017, 9(7), 672; doi:10.3390/nu9070672

Gut Microbiota as a Target for Preventive and Therapeutic Intervention against Food Allergy

1
Department of Translational Medical Science-Pediatric Section, University of Naples “Federico II”, 80131 Naples, Italy
2
Department of Agricultural Sciences, Division of Microbiology, University of Naples “Federico II”, 80055 Portici, Italy
3
Task Force on Microbiome Studies, University of Naples “Federico II”, 80131 Naples, Italy
4
European Laboratory for the Investigation of Food Induced Diseases, University of Naples “Federico II”, 80131 Naples, Italy
5
CEINGE Advanced Biotechnologies, University of Naples “Federico II”, 80131 Naples, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 23 March 2017 / Revised: 15 June 2017 / Accepted: 23 June 2017 / Published: 28 June 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Allergic Diseases)
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Abstract

The gut microbiota plays a pivotal role in immune system development and function. Modification in the gut microbiota composition (dysbiosis) early in life is a critical factor affecting the development of food allergy. Many environmental factors including caesarean delivery, lack of breast milk, drugs, antiseptic agents, and a low-fiber/high-fat diet can induce gut microbiota dysbiosis, and have been associated with the occurrence of food allergy. New technologies and experimental tools have provided information regarding the importance of select bacteria on immune tolerance mechanisms. Short-chain fatty acids are crucial metabolic products of gut microbiota responsible for many protective effects against food allergy. These compounds are involved in epigenetic regulation of the immune system. These evidences provide a foundation for developing innovative strategies to prevent and treat food allergy. Here, we present an overview on the potential role of gut microbiota as the target of intervention against food allergy. View Full-Text
Keywords: cow’s milk allergy; diet; immune tolerance; dysbiosis; probiotics; short chain fatty acids; butyrate cow’s milk allergy; diet; immune tolerance; dysbiosis; probiotics; short chain fatty acids; butyrate
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Aitoro, R.; Paparo, L.; Amoroso, A.; Di Costanzo, M.; Cosenza, L.; Granata, V.; Di Scala, C.; Nocerino, R.; Trinchese, G.; Montella, M.; Ercolini, D.; Berni Canani, R. Gut Microbiota as a Target for Preventive and Therapeutic Intervention against Food Allergy. Nutrients 2017, 9, 672.

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