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Nutrients 2017, 9(6), 627; doi:10.3390/nu9060627

Impact of Second Trimester Maternal Dietary Intake on Gestational Weight Gain and Neonatal Birth Weight

1
Department of Nursing, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Niigata University, 2-746 Asahimachi-dori, Chuo-ku, Niigata 951-8518, Japan
2
Department of Nursing, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya 20400, Sri Lanka
3
Department of Medical Technology, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Niigata University, 2-746 Asahimachi-dori, Chuo-ku, Niigata 951-8518, Japan
4
Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya 20400, Sri Lanka
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 26 May 2017 / Revised: 10 June 2017 / Accepted: 14 June 2017 / Published: 17 June 2017
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Abstract

Poor maternal nutrition is a major contributor to the high incidence of low birth weight deliveries in developing countries. This study aimed to assess the impact of second trimester maternal dietary intake on gestational weight gain and neonatal birth weight. A longitudinal study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital in Sri Lanka. Participants were 141 pregnant women at 18–24 weeks gestation who were followed up until delivery. Maternal dietary intake was assessed using a validated Food Frequency Questionnaire at 21.1 ± 1.8 gestational weeks. Gestational weight gain was examined at the end of 28 weeks gestation and at the end of pregnancy. Energy and nutrient intakes were calculated using NutriSurvey 2007 (EBISpro, Willstaett, Germany) nutrient analysis software, modified for Sri Lankan foods. The mean total gestational weight gain of women with low carbohydrate intake (229–429 g/day) was 2.2 kg less than that of women with moderate carbohydrate intake (430–629 g/day) (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.428–4.083 kg; p = 0.016). Similarly, babies of women with low carbohydrate intake were 312 g lighter compared with those of women with a moderate carbohydrate intake (95% CI 91–534 g; p = 0.006). Our results suggest that second trimester maternal carbohydrate intake has significant impacts on total gestational weight gain and neonatal birth weight. View Full-Text
Keywords: low birth weight; maternal diet; macronutrient; gestational weight gain; nutrition; Sri Lanka low birth weight; maternal diet; macronutrient; gestational weight gain; nutrition; Sri Lanka
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Pathirathna, M.L.; Sekijima, K.; Sadakata, M.; Fujiwara, N.; Muramatsu, Y.; Wimalasiri, K.M. Impact of Second Trimester Maternal Dietary Intake on Gestational Weight Gain and Neonatal Birth Weight. Nutrients 2017, 9, 627.

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