Next Article in Journal
Sleep-Promoting Effects and Possible Mechanisms of Action Associated with a Standardized Rice Bran Supplement
Previous Article in Journal
Protective Effect of Dietary Calcium Intake on Esophageal Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies
Previous Article in Special Issue
Bone-Protective Effects of Dried Plum in Postmenopausal Women: Efficacy and Possible Mechanisms
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Nutrients 2017, 9(5), 511; doi:10.3390/nu9050511

Vegetable and Fruit Intake and Fracture-Related Hospitalisations: A Prospective Study of Older Women

1
School of Medicine and Pharmacology, Royal Perth Hospital Unit, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6000, Australia
2
School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA 6027, Australia
3
Centre for Kidney Research, Children’s Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, NSW 2145, Australia
4
School of Public Health, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
5
Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Flinders University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA 5042, Australia
6
School of Medicine and Pharmacology, QEII Medical Centre Unit, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009, Australia
7
Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, and Department of Renal Medicine, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, WA 6009, Australia
8
School of Biomedical Sciences & Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, WA 6102, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 13 April 2017 / Revised: 12 May 2017 / Accepted: 15 May 2017 / Published: 18 May 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Bioactives and Bone Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [254 KB, uploaded 18 May 2017]

Abstract

The importance of vegetable and fruit intakes for the prevention of fracture in older women is not well understood. Few studies have explored vegetable and fruit intakes separately, or the associations of specific types of vegetables and fruits with fracture hospitalisations. The objective of this study was to examine the associations of vegetable and fruit intakes, separately, and specific types of vegetables and fruits with fracture-related hospitalisations in a prospective cohort of women aged ≥70 years. Vegetable and fruit intakes were assessed at baseline (1998) in 1468 women using a food frequency questionnaire. The incidence of fracture-related hospitalisations over 14.5 years of follow-up was determined using the Hospital Morbidity Data Collection, linked via the Western Australian Data Linkage System. Fractures were identified in 415 (28.3%) women, of which 158 (10.8%) were hip fractures. Higher intakes of vegetables, but not fruits, were associated with lower fracture incidence. In multivariable-adjusted models for vegetable types, cruciferous and allium vegetables were inversely associated with all fractures, with a hazard ratio (HR) (95% confidence interval) of 0.72 (0.54, 0.95) and 0.66 (0.49, 0.88), respectively, for the highest vs. lowest quartiles. Increasing vegetable intake, with an emphasis on cruciferous and allium vegetables, may prevent fractures in older postmenopausal women. View Full-Text
Keywords: vegetables; fruit; cruciferous; allium; fracture; bone; postmenopausal women vegetables; fruit; cruciferous; allium; fracture; bone; postmenopausal women
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Blekkenhorst, L.C.; Hodgson, J.M.; Lewis, J.R.; Devine, A.; Woodman, R.J.; Lim, W.H.; Wong, G.; Zhu, K.; Bondonno, C.P.; Ward, N.C.; Prince, R.L. Vegetable and Fruit Intake and Fracture-Related Hospitalisations: A Prospective Study of Older Women. Nutrients 2017, 9, 511.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Nutrients EISSN 2072-6643 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top