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Nutrients 2017, 9(4), 375; doi:10.3390/nu9040375

Neonatal Citrulline Supplementation and Later Exposure to a High Fructose Diet in Rats Born with a Low Birth Weight: A Preliminary Report

1
INRA, UMR 1280, Physiology of Nutritional Adaptations, University of Nantes, IMAD and CRNH-Ouest, Nantes 44000, France
2
Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Hotel-Dieu, Nantes 44000, France
3
Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Ho Chi Minh City 70000, Vietnam
4
Nutrition Support Team, IMAD, University Medical Center of Nantes, Nantes 44000, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 7 February 2017 / Revised: 19 March 2017 / Accepted: 29 March 2017 / Published: 11 April 2017
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Abstract

A low birth weight (LBW) leads to a higher risk of metabolic syndrome in adulthood. Literature suggests that citrulline supplementation in adulthood prevents the effect of a high fructose diet on energy metabolism. Whether neonatal citrulline supplementation would alter early growth or energy metabolism in the long-term in rats with LBW is unknown. LBW pups born from dams fed a low (4%) protein diet, were nursed by normally-fed dams and received isonitrogenous supplements of either l-citrulline or l-alanine by gavage from the sixth day of life until weaning, and were subsequently exposed to 10%-fructose in drinking water from weaning to 90 days of age. The oral glucose tolerance was tested (OGTT) at 70 days of age, and rats were sacrificed at 90 days of age. Pre-weaning citrulline supplementation failed to alter the growth trajectory, OGTT, plasma triglycerides, or fat mass accretion in adulthood; yet, it was associated with increased liver triglycerides, decreased liver total cholesterol, and a distinct liver lipidomic profile that may result in a predisposition to liver disease. We conclude that pre-weaning supplementation with citrulline does not impact early growth, but might impact liver fat metabolism in adulthood upon exposure to a high fructose diet. View Full-Text
Keywords: low birth weight; amino acids; metabolic syndrome; liver; lipidomics; developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD) low birth weight; amino acids; metabolic syndrome; liver; lipidomics; developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD)
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Tran, N.-T.; Alexandre-Gouabau, M.-C.; Pagniez, A.; Ouguerram, K.; Boquien, C.-Y.; Winer, N.; Darmaun, D. Neonatal Citrulline Supplementation and Later Exposure to a High Fructose Diet in Rats Born with a Low Birth Weight: A Preliminary Report. Nutrients 2017, 9, 375.

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