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Nutrients 2017, 9(3), 272; doi:10.3390/nu9030272

Bioavailability of Microencapsulated Iron from Fortified Bread Assessed Using Piglet Model

1
Faculty of Biotechnology and Food Sciences, Lodz University of Technology, Lodz 90-924, Poland
2
Department of Agro-Food Science and Technology, University of Bologna, Cesena 47521, Italy
3
Department of Veterinary Medical Sciences, University of Bologna, Ozzano dell’Emilia 40064, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 15 February 2017 / Revised: 6 March 2017 / Accepted: 9 March 2017 / Published: 13 March 2017
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Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of oral iron supplementation, in the form of fortified breads, on the growth performance, health, iron status parameters, and fecal metabolome of anemic piglets. A study was conducted on 24 hybrid (Large White × Landrace × Duroc) piglets. From day 44, the post-natal 12 piglets were supplemented with 100 g of one of two experimental breads, each fortified with 21 mg of ferrous sulphate, either encapsulated or not. After one week of oral supplementation, hematological parameters (hematocrit value, hemoglobin, and red blood cells) showed statistically significant differences (p ≤ 0.05). Piglets fed with the fortified breads had higher iron concentrations in the heart, liver, and intestinal mucosa compared to anemic piglets fed with control bread. Gene expression of hepcidin, iron exporter ferroportin (IREG1), and divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), together with concentrations of plasma ferritin, showed no significant statistical differences between groups. Both fortified breads could be used as sources of bioavailable iron. The seven-day intervention trial showed microencapsulation to have only a mild effect on the effectiveness of iron supplementation in the form of fortified bread. View Full-Text
Keywords: microencapsulated iron; fortified bread; iron bioavailability; piglet model; iron deficiency; anemia; metabolome microencapsulated iron; fortified bread; iron bioavailability; piglet model; iron deficiency; anemia; metabolome
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MDPI and ACS Style

Bryszewska, M.A.; Laghi, L.; Zannoni, A.; Gianotti, A.; Barone, F.; Taneyo Saa, D.L.; Bacci, M.L.; Ventrella, D.; Forni, M. Bioavailability of Microencapsulated Iron from Fortified Bread Assessed Using Piglet Model. Nutrients 2017, 9, 272.

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