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Nutrients 2017, 9(11), 1260; doi:10.3390/nu9111260

Adherence to Hunger Training over 6 Months and the Effect on Weight and Eating Behaviour: Secondary Analysis of a Randomised Controlled Trial

1
Department of Human Nutrition, University of Otago, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand
2
Department of Medicine, University of Otago, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand
3
Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, University of Otago, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand
4
Nutrition Society of New Zealand, Whanganui 4543, New Zealand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 26 August 2017 / Revised: 17 October 2017 / Accepted: 14 November 2017 / Published: 17 November 2017
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Abstract

Monitoring blood glucose prior to eating can teach individuals to eat only when truly hungry, but how adherence to ‘hunger training’ influences weight loss and eating behaviour is uncertain. This exploratory, secondary analysis from a larger randomized controlled trial examined five indices of adherence to ‘hunger training’, chosen a priori, to examine which adherence measure best predicted weight loss over 6 months. We subsequently explored how the best measure of adherence influenced eating behavior in terms of intuitive and emotional eating. Retention was 72% (n = 36/50) at 6 months. Frequency of hunger training booklet entry most strongly predicted weight loss, followed by frequency of blood glucose measurements. Participants who completed at least 60 days of booklet entry (of recommended 63 days) lost 6.8 kg (95% CI: 2.6, 11.0; p < 0.001) more weight than those who completed fewer days. They also had significantly higher intuitive eating scores than those who completed 30 days or less of booklet entry; a difference (95% CI) of 0.73 (0.12, 1.35) in body-food choice congruence and 0.79 (0.06, 1.51) for eating for physical rather than emotional reasons. Adherent participants also reported significantly lower scores for emotional eating of −0.70 (−1.13, −0.27). Following hunger training and focusing on simply recording ratings of hunger on a regular basis can produce clinically significant weight loss and clinically relevant improvements in eating behaviour. View Full-Text
Keywords: food intake regulation; hunger; obesity; blood glucose self-monitoring; adherence food intake regulation; hunger; obesity; blood glucose self-monitoring; adherence
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Jospe, M.R.; Taylor, R.W.; Athens, J.; Roy, M.; Brown, R.C. Adherence to Hunger Training over 6 Months and the Effect on Weight and Eating Behaviour: Secondary Analysis of a Randomised Controlled Trial. Nutrients 2017, 9, 1260.

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