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Nutrients 2017, 9(1), 63; doi:10.3390/nu9010063

Cheese Consumption and Risk of All-Cause Mortality: A Meta-Analysis of Prospective Studies

1
Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Soochow University, 199 Renai Road, Suzhou 215123, China
2
Key Laboratory of Radiation Biology, School of Radiation Medicine and Protection, 199 Renai Road, Suzhou 215123, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 7 October 2016 / Revised: 14 November 2016 / Accepted: 9 January 2017 / Published: 13 January 2017
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Abstract

The association between cheese consumption and risk for major health endpoints has been investigated in many epidemiologic studies, but findings are inconsistent. As all-cause mortality can be viewed as the final net health effect of dietary intakes, we conducted a meta-analysis to examine the long-term association of cheese consumption with all-cause mortality. Relevant studies were identified by a search of the PubMed database through May 2016. Reference lists from retrieved articles were also reviewed. Summary relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using a random-effects model. Pre-specified stratified and dose-response analyses were also performed. The final analysis included nine prospective cohort studies involving 21,365 deaths. The summary RR of all-cause mortality for the highest compared with the lowest cheese consumption was 1.02 (95% CI: 0.97, 1.06), and little evidence of heterogeneity was observed. The association between cheese consumption and risk of all-cause mortality did not significantly differ by study location, sex, age, number of events, study quality score or baseline diseases excluded. There was no dose-response relationship between cheese consumption and risk of all-cause mortality (RR per 43 g/day = 1.03, 95% CI: 0.99–1.07). No significant publication bias was observed. Our findings suggest that long-term cheese consumption was not associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality. View Full-Text
Keywords: cheese; dairy; fermented food; mortality; meta-analysis cheese; dairy; fermented food; mortality; meta-analysis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Tong, X.; Chen, G.-C.; Zhang, Z.; Wei, Y.-L.; Xu, J.-Y.; Qin, L.-Q. Cheese Consumption and Risk of All-Cause Mortality: A Meta-Analysis of Prospective Studies. Nutrients 2017, 9, 63.

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