Next Article in Journal
What Do We Know Now about IgE-Mediated Wheat Allergy in Children?
Next Article in Special Issue
Ethical Challenges in Infant Feeding Research
Previous Article in Journal
Postprandial Glycemic and Insulinemic Responses to Common Breakfast Beverages Consumed with a Standard Meal in Adults Who Are Overweight and Obese
Previous Article in Special Issue
Retinol and α-Tocopherol in the Breast Milk of Women after a High-Risk Pregnancy
Article Menu
Issue 1 (January) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Nutrients 2017, 9(1), 34; doi:10.3390/nu9010034

Introduction of Complementary Foods in a Cohort of Infants in Northeast Italy: Do Parents Comply with WHO Recommendations?

Clinical Epidemiology and Public Health Research Unit, Institute for Maternal and Child Health IRCCS “Burlo Garofolo”, Via dell’Istria 65/1, Trieste 34137, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 30 September 2016 / Revised: 30 November 2016 / Accepted: 22 December 2016 / Published: 4 January 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrients in Infancy)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [759 KB, uploaded 4 January 2017]   |  

Abstract

Timing and type of complementary food in infancy affect nutritional status and health later in life. The objective of this paper was to assess complementary feeding practices, looking at timing, type, and compliance with World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations. Data were obtained from a birth cohort of 400 infants, enrolled in Trieste (Italy) between July 2007 and July 2008 and followed up for three years, using a “food introduction timing table”. Five WHO recommendations standards were used to assess parental compliance and associated factors. Thirty seven percent of mothers returned the completed “timing table” up until the child was three years of age. Eighty six percent of infants were already receiving complementary foods at six months. The first food type to be introduced was fresh fruit (170 days from birth, median). Overall, infants shared a very similar diet, which was different from the family diet and characterized by delayed introduction of certain food types. Five percent of parents complied with either all five or only one of the WHO recommendations, 34% with three, and 35% with four. The parents’ partial compliance with WHO recommendations is probably due to conflicting information received from different sources. This advocates for national evidence-based guidelines, supported and promoted by health professionals. View Full-Text
Keywords: complementary feeding; compliance with WHO recommendation; timing of introduction of complementary food; infant nutrition; Italy complementary feeding; compliance with WHO recommendation; timing of introduction of complementary food; infant nutrition; Italy
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Carletti, C.; Pani, P.; Monasta, L.; Knowles, A.; Cattaneo, A. Introduction of Complementary Foods in a Cohort of Infants in Northeast Italy: Do Parents Comply with WHO Recommendations? Nutrients 2017, 9, 34.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Nutrients EISSN 2072-6643 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top