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Nutrients 2016, 8(2), 69; doi:10.3390/nu8020069

Anorexia of Aging: Risk Factors, Consequences, and Potential Treatments

Department of Geriatrics, Neurosciences and Orthopedics, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome 00168, Italy
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Received: 19 December 2015 / Accepted: 20 January 2016 / Published: 27 January 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food and Appetite)
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Abstract

Older people frequently fail to ingest adequate amount of food to meet their essential energy and nutrient requirements. Anorexia of aging, defined by decrease in appetite and/or food intake in old age, is a major contributing factor to under-nutrition and adverse health outcomes in the geriatric population. This disorder is indeed highly prevalent and is recognized as an independent predictor of morbidity and mortality in different clinical settings. Even though anorexia is not an unavoidable consequence of aging, advancing age often promotes its development through various mechanisms. Age-related changes in life-style, disease conditions, as well as social and environmental factors have the potential to directly affect dietary behaviors and nutritional status. In spite of their importance, problems related to food intake and, more generally, nutritional status are seldom attended to in clinical practice. While this may be the result of an “ageist” approach, it should be acknowledged that simple interventions, such as oral nutritional supplementation or modified diets, could meaningfully improve the health status and quality of life of older persons. View Full-Text
Keywords: nutrition; protein; ghrelin; geriatric syndrome; supplementation; frailty; sarcopenia; malnutrition; appetite; food intake nutrition; protein; ghrelin; geriatric syndrome; supplementation; frailty; sarcopenia; malnutrition; appetite; food intake
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Landi, F.; Calvani, R.; Tosato, M.; Martone, A.M.; Ortolani, E.; Savera, G.; Sisto, A.; Marzetti, E. Anorexia of Aging: Risk Factors, Consequences, and Potential Treatments. Nutrients 2016, 8, 69.

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