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Nutrients 2016, 8(12), 761; doi:10.3390/nu8120761

Dietary B Vitamins and a 10-Year Risk of Dementia in Older Persons

1
University Bordeaux, Institut de Santé Publique d’Epidémiologie et de Développement (ISPED), Centre INSERM U1219-Bordeaux Population Health, Bordeaux 33076, France
2
Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM), Institut de Santé Publique d’Epidémiologie et de Développement (ISPED), Centre INSERM U1219-Bordeaux Population Health, Bordeaux 33076, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 13 September 2016 / Revised: 21 November 2016 / Accepted: 21 November 2016 / Published: 26 November 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue B-Vitamins and One-Carbon Metabolism)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [579 KB, uploaded 26 November 2016]   |  

Abstract

B vitamins may lower the risk of dementia, yet epidemiological findings, mostly from countries with folic acid fortification, have remained inconsistent. We evaluated in a large French cohort of older persons the associations between dietary B vitamins and long-term incident dementia. We included 1321 participants from the Three-City Study who completed a 24 h dietary recall, were free of dementia at the time of diet assessment, and were followed for an average of 7.4 years. In Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for multiple potential confounders, including overall diet quality, higher intake of folate was inversely associated with the risk of dementia (p for trend = 0.02), with an approximately 50% lower risk for individuals in the highest compared to the lowest quintile of folate (HR = 0.47; 95% CI 0.28; 0.81). No association was found for vitamins B6 and B12. In conclusion, in a large French cohort with a relatively low baseline folate status (average intake = 278 µg/day), higher folate intakes were associated with a decreased risk of dementia. View Full-Text
Keywords: folate; B vitamins; dementia; aging folate; B vitamins; dementia; aging
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Lefèvre-Arbogast, S.; Féart, C.; Dartigues, J.-F.; Helmer, C.; Letenneur, L.; Samieri, C. Dietary B Vitamins and a 10-Year Risk of Dementia in Older Persons. Nutrients 2016, 8, 761.

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