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Nutrients 2015, 7(6), 4526-4541; doi:10.3390/nu7064526

Long-Term Supplementation with Beta Serum Concentrate (BSC), a Complex of Milk Lipids, during Post-Natal Brain Development Improves Memory in Rats

1
Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, 85 Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 1142 , New Zealand
2
Centre for Brain Research, the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, 85 Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
3
Fonterra Research and Development Centre, Private Bag 11029, Palmerston North 4442, New Zealand
4
Fonterra Co-operative Group Ltd., Palmerston North 4442, New Zealand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 1 May 2015 / Revised: 22 May 2015 / Accepted: 26 May 2015 / Published: 5 June 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition in Cognitive Function)
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Abstract

We have previously reported that the supplementation of ganglioside-enriched complex-milk-lipids improves cognitive function and that a phospholipid-enriched complex-milk-lipid prevents age-related cognitive decline in rats. This current study evaluated the effects of post-natal supplementation of ganglioside- and phospholipid-enriched complex-milk-lipids beta serum concentrate (BSC) on cognitive function in young rats. The diet of male rats was supplemented with either gels formulated BSC (n = 16) or blank gels (n = 16) from post-natal day 10 to day 70. Memory and anxiety-like behaviors were evaluated using the Morris water maze, dark–light boxes, and elevated plus maze tests. Neuroplasticity and white matter were measured using immunohistochemical staining. The overall performance in seven-day acquisition trials was similar between the groups. Compared with the control group, BSC supplementation reduced the latency to the platform during day one of the acquisition tests. Supplementation improved memory by showing reduced latency and improved path efficiency to the platform quadrant, and smaller initial heading error from the platform zone. Supplemented rats showed an increase in striatal dopamine terminals and hippocampal glutamate receptors. Thus BSC supplementation during post-natal brain development improved learning and memory, independent from anxiety. The moderately enhanced neuroplasticity in dopamine and glutamate may be biological changes underlying the improved cognitive function. View Full-Text
Keywords: beta serum concentrate; milk fat globule membrane; gangliosides; phospholipids; brain development; memory; Morris water maze; neuroplasticity beta serum concentrate; milk fat globule membrane; gangliosides; phospholipids; brain development; memory; Morris water maze; neuroplasticity
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Guan, J.; MacGibbon, A.; Fong, B.; Zhang, R.; Liu, K.; Rowan, A.; McJarrow, P. Long-Term Supplementation with Beta Serum Concentrate (BSC), a Complex of Milk Lipids, during Post-Natal Brain Development Improves Memory in Rats. Nutrients 2015, 7, 4526-4541.

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