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Nutrients 2015, 7(5), 3569-3586; doi:10.3390/nu7053569

Diet Soft Drink Consumption is Associated with the Metabolic Syndrome: A Two Sample Comparison

1
Alliance for Research in Exercise, Nutrition and Activity (ARENA), Sansom Institute for Health Research, University of South Australia, Adelaide 5001, Australia
2
Luxembourg Health Institute (L.I.H.) (formerly Centre de Recherche Public Santé, Centre d'Etudes en Santé), L-1445, Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg
3
Department of Psychology, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469, USA
4
Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences and Engineering, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 6 February 2015 / Revised: 28 April 2015 / Accepted: 4 May 2015 / Published: 13 May 2015
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Abstract

Comparative analyses of soft drink intakes in samples from the United States and Europe, and assessed intakes in relation to prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its individual components are currently lacking. We used data collected on cardiovascular health and dietary intakes in participants from two cross-sectional studies: the Maine-Syracuse Longitudinal Study (MSLS), conducted in Central New York, USA in 2001–2006 (n = 803), and the Observation of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Luxembourg Study (ORISCAV-LUX), conducted in 2007–2009 (n = 1323). Odds ratios for MetS were estimated according to type and quantity of soft drink consumption, adjusting for demographic, lifestyle and dietary factors, in both studies. In both studies, individuals who consumed at least one soft drink per day had a higher prevalence of MetS, than non-consumers. This was most evident for consumers of diet soft drinks, consistent across both studies. Diet soft drink intakes were also positively associated with waist circumference and fasting plasma glucose in both studies. Despite quite different consumption patterns of diet versus regular soft drinks in the two studies, findings from both support the notion that diet soft drinks are associated with a higher prevalence of MetS. View Full-Text
Keywords: soft drink; diet soft drink; metabolic syndrome; international comparison soft drink; diet soft drink; metabolic syndrome; international comparison
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Crichton, G.; Alkerwi, A.; Elias, M. Diet Soft Drink Consumption is Associated with the Metabolic Syndrome: A Two Sample Comparison. Nutrients 2015, 7, 3569-3586.

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