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Nutrients 2015, 7(3), 1464-1479; doi:10.3390/nu7031464

Reducing Postpartum Weight Retention and Improving Breastfeeding Outcomes in Overweight Women: A Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial

1
School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, Newcastle 2308, New South Wales, Australia
2
School of Medicine and Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, Newcastle 2308, New South Wales, Australia
3
Mothers and Babies Research Centre, Hunter Medical Research Institute, John Hunter Hospital, Level 3, Endocrinology, Locked Bag 1, Hunter Region Mail Centre, Newcastle 2310, New South Wales, Australia
4
Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, Newcastle 2308, New South Wales, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 30 October 2014 / Revised: 1 December 2014 / Accepted: 15 February 2015 / Published: 25 February 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition in Pregnancy)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [224 KB, uploaded 27 February 2015]   |  

Abstract

Overweight and obesity is prevalent among women of reproductive age (42% BMI > 25 kg/m2) and parity is associated with risk of weight gain. Weight gain greater than that recommended by the Institute of Medicine (IOM )is also associated with lower rates of breastfeeding initiation and duration in women. The aim of this pilot randomised controlled trial is to examine the feasibility of recruiting and maintaining a cohort of pregnant women with the view of reducing postpartum weight retention and improving breastfeeding outcomes. Women (BMI of 25–35 kg/m2 (n = 36)) were recruited from the John Hunter Hospital antenatal clinic in New South Wales, Australia. Participants were stratified by BMI and randomised to one of three groups with follow-up to six months postpartum. Women received a dietary intervention with or without breastfeeding support from a lactation consultant, or were assigned to a wait-list control group where the dietary intervention was issued at three months postpartum. Feasibility and acceptability was assessed by participation rates and questionnaire. Analysis of variance and covariance was conducted to determine any differences between groups. Sixty-nine per cent of the participants were still enrolled at six months postpartum. This pilot demonstrated some difficulties in recruiting women from antenatal clinics and retaining them in the trial. Although underpowered; the results on weight; biomarkers and breastfeeding outcomes indicated improved metabolic health. View Full-Text
Keywords: maternal; pregnancy; dietary intake; breastfeeding; postpartum weight retention maternal; pregnancy; dietary intake; breastfeeding; postpartum weight retention
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Martin, J.; MacDonald-Wicks, L.; Hure, A.; Smith, R.; Collins, C.E. Reducing Postpartum Weight Retention and Improving Breastfeeding Outcomes in Overweight Women: A Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial. Nutrients 2015, 7, 1464-1479.

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