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Nutrients 2015, 7(12), 10032-10052; doi:10.3390/nu7125519

Concord Grape Juice Polyphenols and Cardiovascular Risk Factors: Dose-Response Relationships

1
Antioxidants Research Laboratory, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging Tufts University, Boston, MA 02111, USA
2
Evans Department of Medicine and the Whitaker Cardiovascular Institute, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02118, USA
3
Antioxidants Research Laboratory, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging Tufts University, Boston, MA 02111, USA
Deceased on 2 November 2014.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 10 October 2015 / Revised: 9 November 2015 / Accepted: 23 November 2015 / Published: 2 December 2015
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Abstract

Pure fruit juices provide nutritional value with evidence suggesting some of their benefits on biomarkers of cardiovascular disease risk may be derived from their constituent polyphenols, particularly flavonoids. However, few data from clinical trials are available on the dose-response relationship of fruit juice flavonoids to these outcomes. Utilizing the results of clinical trials testing single doses, we have analyzed data from studies of 100% Concord grape juice by placing its flavonoid content in the context of results from randomized clinical trials of other polyphenol-rich foods and beverages describing the same outcomes but covering a broader range of intake. We selected established biomarkers determined by similar methods for measuring flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD), blood pressure, platelet aggregation, and the resistance of low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) to oxidation. Despite differences among the clinical trials in the treatment, subjects, and duration, correlations were observed between the dose and FMD. Inverse dose-response relationships, albeit with lower correlation coefficients, were also noted for the other outcomes. These results suggest a clear relationship between consumption of even modest serving sizes of Concord grape juice, flavonoid intake, and effects on risk factors for cardiovascular disease. This approach to dose-response relationships may prove useful for testing other individual foods and beverages. View Full-Text
Keywords: concord grape juice; polyphenols; flavonoids; cardiovascular risk factors; blood pressure; platelet aggregation; flow-mediated dilation; LDL oxidation concord grape juice; polyphenols; flavonoids; cardiovascular risk factors; blood pressure; platelet aggregation; flow-mediated dilation; LDL oxidation
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Blumberg, J.B.; Vita, J.A.; Chen, C..-Y. Concord Grape Juice Polyphenols and Cardiovascular Risk Factors: Dose-Response Relationships. Nutrients 2015, 7, 10032-10052.

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