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Nutrients 2014, 6(10), 4178-4190; doi:10.3390/nu6104178

The Effect of Turmeric (Curcuma longa) Extract on the Functionality of the Solute Carrier Protein 22 A4 (SLC22A4) and Interleukin-10 (IL-10) Variants Associated with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

1
Food Nutrition & Health, Food and Bio-Based Products, AgResearch Grasslands Research Centre, Palmerston North 4442, New Zealand
2
Nutrigenomics New Zealand, Plant and Food Research Ltd., Private Bag 92169, Auckland Mail Centre, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
3
Gravida: National Centre for Growth and Development, The Liggins Institute, The University of Auckland, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
4
The Riddet Institute, Massey University, Palmerston North 4442, New Zealand
5
Department of Chemistry, University of Otago, P.O. Box 56, Dunedin 9016, New Zealand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 19 July 2014 / Revised: 9 September 2014 / Accepted: 29 September 2014 / Published: 13 October 2014
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Abstract

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic relapsing disease. Genetic predisposition to the disease reduces an individual’s capacity to respond appropriately to environmental challenges in the intestine leading to inappropriate inflammation. IBD patients often modify their diet to mitigate or reduce the severity of inflammation. Turmeric (Curcuma longa L., Zingiberaceae) has historically been used in Chinese, Hindu, and Ayurvedic medicine over several centuries to treat inflammatory disorders. To understand how turmeric may influence the consequences of a genetic predisposition to inappropriate inflammation, we used HEK293 cells to examine the in vitro capacity of turmeric extract and fractions to affect the functionality of two gene variants, solute carrier protein 22 A4 (SLC22A4, rs1050152) and interleukin-10 (IL-10, rs1800896) associated with IBD. We found that a turmeric extract and several chromatographically separated fractions beneficially affected the variants of SLC22A4 and IL-10 associated with IBD, by reducing inappropriate epithelial cell transport (SLC22A4, 503F) and increasing anti-inflammatory cytokine gene promoter activity (IL-10, −1082A). The effect of turmeric on the IL-10 variant was strongly associated with the curcumin content of the extract and its fractions. View Full-Text
Keywords: turmeric; curcumin; IL-10; inflammatory bowel disease; SLC22A4; OCTN1; nutrigenomics turmeric; curcumin; IL-10; inflammatory bowel disease; SLC22A4; OCTN1; nutrigenomics
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

McCann, M.J.; Johnston, S.; Reilly, K.; Men, X.; Burgess, E.J.; Perry, N.B.; Roy, N.C. The Effect of Turmeric (Curcuma longa) Extract on the Functionality of the Solute Carrier Protein 22 A4 (SLC22A4) and Interleukin-10 (IL-10) Variants Associated with Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Nutrients 2014, 6, 4178-4190.

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