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Nutrients 2018, 10(6), 769; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10060769

Bolus Ingestion of Whey Protein Immediately Post-Exercise Does Not Influence Rehydration Compared to Energy-Matched Carbohydrate Ingestion

1
School of Healthcare Science, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester M1 5GD, UK
2
Faculty of Biology, Medical and Health Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PT, UK
3
School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 4 June 2018 / Accepted: 11 June 2018 / Published: 14 June 2018
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Abstract

Whey protein is a commonly ingested nutritional supplement amongst athletes and regular exercisers; however, its role in post-exercise rehydration remains unclear. Eight healthy male and female participants completed two experimental trials involving the ingestion of 35 g of whey protein (WP) or maltodextrin (MD) at the onset of a rehydration period, followed by ingestion of water to a volume equivalent to 150% of the amount of body mass lost during exercise in the heat. The gastric emptying rates of the solutions were measured using 13C breath tests. Recovery was monitored for a further 3 h by the collection of blood and urine samples. The time taken to empty half of the initial solution (T1/2) was different between the trials (WP = 65.5 ± 11.4 min; MD = 56.7 ± 6.3 min; p = 0.05); however, there was no difference in cumulative urine volume throughout the recovery period (WP = 1306 ± 306 mL; MD = 1428 ± 443 mL; p = 0.314). Participants returned to net negative fluid balance 2 h after the recovery period with MD and 3 h with WP. The results of this study suggest that whey protein empties from the stomach at a slower rate than MD; however, this does not seem to exert any positive or negative effects on the maintenance of fluid balance in the post-exercise period. View Full-Text
Keywords: whey protein; maltodextrin; fluid balance; rehydration; gastric emptying; albumin; exercise; recovery whey protein; maltodextrin; fluid balance; rehydration; gastric emptying; albumin; exercise; recovery
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Evans, G.H.; Mattin, L.; Ireland, I.; Harrison, W.; Yau, A.M.W.; McIver, V.; Pocock, T.; Sheader, E.; James, L.J. Bolus Ingestion of Whey Protein Immediately Post-Exercise Does Not Influence Rehydration Compared to Energy-Matched Carbohydrate Ingestion. Nutrients 2018, 10, 769.

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