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Nutrients 2018, 10(5), 630; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10050630

Capsaicin in Metabolic Syndrome

1
Functional Foods Research Group, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba QLD 4350, Australia
2
School of Health and Wellbeing, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba QLD 4350, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 15 April 2018 / Revised: 7 May 2018 / Accepted: 14 May 2018 / Published: 17 May 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrients, Bioactives and Insulin Resistance)
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Abstract

Capsaicin, the major active constituent of chilli, is an agonist on transient receptor potential vanilloid channel 1 (TRPV1). TRPV1 is present on many metabolically active tissues, making it a potentially relevant target for metabolic interventions. Insulin resistance and obesity, being the major components of metabolic syndrome, increase the risk for the development of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. In vitro and pre-clinical studies have established the effectiveness of low-dose dietary capsaicin in attenuating metabolic disorders. These responses of capsaicin are mediated through activation of TRPV1, which can then modulate processes such as browning of adipocytes, and activation of metabolic modulators including AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). Modulation of these pathways by capsaicin can increase fat oxidation, improve insulin sensitivity, decrease body fat, and improve heart and liver function. Identifying suitable ways of administering capsaicin at an effective dose would warrant its clinical use through the activation of TRPV1. This review highlights the mechanistic options to improve metabolic syndrome with capsaicin. View Full-Text
Keywords: capsaicin; metabolic syndrome; transient receptor potential vanilloid channel 1; TRPV1; obesity; insulin resistance; diabetes; non-alcoholic fatty liver disease capsaicin; metabolic syndrome; transient receptor potential vanilloid channel 1; TRPV1; obesity; insulin resistance; diabetes; non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
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Panchal, S.K.; Bliss, E.; Brown, L. Capsaicin in Metabolic Syndrome. Nutrients 2018, 10, 630.

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