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Nutrients 2018, 10(2), 224; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10020224

Achieving Optimal Post-Exercise Muscle Protein Remodeling in Physically Active Adults through Whole Food Consumption

1
Center for Human Nutrition, School of Medicine, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA
2
Division of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Campaign, Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801, USA
3
Department of Kinesiology and Community Health, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801, USA
These authors contributed equally to the manuscript.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 2 January 2018 / Revised: 9 February 2018 / Accepted: 14 February 2018 / Published: 16 February 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Protein for Post-Exercise Recovery and Performance)
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Abstract

Dietary protein ingestion is critical to maintaining the quality and quantity of skeletal muscle mass throughout adult life. The performance of acute exercise enhances muscle protein remodeling by stimulating protein synthesis rates for several hours after each bout, which can be optimized by consuming protein during the post-exercise recovery period. To date, the majority of the evidence regarding protein intake to optimize post-exercise muscle protein synthesis rates is limited to isolated protein sources. However, it is more common to ingest whole food sources of protein within a normal eating pattern. Emerging evidence demonstrates a promising role for the ingestion of whole foods as an effective nutritional strategy to support muscle protein remodeling and recovery after exercise. This review aims to evaluate the efficacy of the ingestion of nutrient-rich and protein-dense whole foods to support post-exercise muscle protein remodeling and recovery with pertinence towards physically active people. View Full-Text
Keywords: amino acids; athletic performance; muscle protein synthesis; resistance exercise; endurance exercise amino acids; athletic performance; muscle protein synthesis; resistance exercise; endurance exercise
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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van Vliet, S.; Beals, J.W.; Martinez, I.G.; Skinner, S.K.; Burd, N.A. Achieving Optimal Post-Exercise Muscle Protein Remodeling in Physically Active Adults through Whole Food Consumption. Nutrients 2018, 10, 224.

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