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Remote Sens. 2015, 7(12), 17190-17211; doi:10.3390/rs71215876

Satellite and Ground Based Thermal Observation of the 2014 Effusive Eruption at Stromboli Volcano

1
Institute of Geophysics, Center for Earth System Research and Sustainability, University of Hamburg, Bundesstraße 55, Hamburg D-20146, Germany
2
German Aerospace Center, Optical Information Systems, Rutherfordstraße 2, Berlin D-12489, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Zhong Lu, Peter Webley and Prasad S. Thenkabail
Received: 6 September 2015 / Revised: 3 December 2015 / Accepted: 8 December 2015 / Published: 18 December 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Volcano Remote Sensing)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [2008 KB, uploaded 18 December 2015]   |  

Abstract

As specifically designed platforms are still unavailable at this point in time, lava flows are usually monitored remotely with the use of meteorological satellites. Generally, meteorological satellites have a low spatial resolution, which leads to uncertain results. This paper presents the first long term satellite monitoring of active lava flows on Stromboli volcano (August–November 2014) at high spatial resolution (160 m) and relatively high temporal resolution (~3 days). These data were retrieved by the small satellite Technology Experiment Carrier-1 (TET-1), which was developed and built by the German Aerospace Center (DLR). The satellite instrument is dedicated to high temperature event monitoring. The satellite observations were accompanied by field observations conducted by thermal cameras. These provided short time lava flow dynamics and validation for satellite data. TET-1 retrieved 27 datasets over Stromboli during its effusive activity. Using the radiant density approach, TET-1 data were used to calibrate the MODVOLC data and estimate the time averaged lava discharge rate. With a mean output rate of 0.87 m3/s during the three-month-long eruption, we estimate the total erupted volume to be 7.4 × 106 m3. View Full-Text
Keywords: volcanic thermal anomalies; lava flow; time averaged lava discharge rate; Stromboli; small satellites; TET-1 volcanic thermal anomalies; lava flow; time averaged lava discharge rate; Stromboli; small satellites; TET-1
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Zakšek, K.; Hort, M.; Lorenz, E. Satellite and Ground Based Thermal Observation of the 2014 Effusive Eruption at Stromboli Volcano. Remote Sens. 2015, 7, 17190-17211.

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