Next Article in Journal
Multilateral Governance for Climate Change Adaptation in S. Korea: The Mechanisms of Formulating Adaptation Policies
Previous Article in Journal
Crude Oil Contaminated Sites: Evaluation by Using Risk Assessment Approach
Previous Article in Special Issue
Does “Greening” of Neotropical Cities Considerably Mitigate Carbon Dioxide Emissions? The Case of Medellin, Colombia
Article Menu
Issue 8 (August) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Sustainability 2017, 9(8), 1368; doi:10.3390/su9081368

Applying the Concept of Perceived Restoration to the Case of Cheonggyecheon Stream Park in Seoul, Korea

1
Bureau of Ecological Research, Division of Ecosystem Services and Research Planning, National Institute of Ecology, Chungcheongnam-do 33657, Korea
2
Department of Environmental Planning, Interdisciplinary Program in Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning Institute, Gwanak-ro 1, Gwanak-gu, 82-222, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Korea
3
Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Gwanak-ro 1, Gwanak-gu, 82-222, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 21 June 2017 / Revised: 31 July 2017 / Accepted: 1 August 2017 / Published: 3 August 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nature-Based Solutions for Urban Challenges)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [690 KB, uploaded 3 August 2017]   |  

Abstract

Studies on perceived restoration have focused on the differences between natural and artificial environments, whereas studies on what makes people select a particular restorative environment are limited. Using the location of Cheonggyecheon Stream Park in the urban center of Seoul, South Korea, this study tests whether people self-select locations based on individual and environmental characteristics. Empirical testing was conducted on 268 responses on a visitor survey that was developed based on the Perceived Restorativeness Scale. The major findings were that visitors’ characteristics such as gender, age, number of companions, visit frequency, and travel mode affect their selection of a particular setting, and that the chosen setting subsequently influences three dimensions of the Scale: being away, fascination, and coherence. These findings suggest that both individual and environmental characteristics should be considered in the creation of an effective perceived restorative environment in an urban center. View Full-Text
Keywords: Attention Restoration Theory; Perceived Restoration Scale; urban open space Attention Restoration Theory; Perceived Restoration Scale; urban open space
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Kim, M.; Gim, T.-H.T.; Sung, J.-S. Applying the Concept of Perceived Restoration to the Case of Cheonggyecheon Stream Park in Seoul, Korea. Sustainability 2017, 9, 1368.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Sustainability EISSN 2071-1050 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top