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Sustainability 2017, 9(12), 2209; doi:10.3390/su9122209

Assessing the Sensitivity of Small-Scale Fishery Groups to Climate Change in Lake Kariba, Zimbabwe

1
United Nations University Institute for the Advanced Study of Sustainability (UNU-IAS), 5-53-70 Jingumae, Shibuya, Tokyo 150-8925, Japan
2
Lake Kariba Fisheries Research Institute, P.O. Box 75, Kariba 061, Zimbabwe
3
Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8657, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 4 October 2017 / Revised: 23 November 2017 / Accepted: 23 November 2017 / Published: 29 November 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Sustainable Use of the Environment and Resources)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [522 KB, uploaded 29 November 2017]   |  

Abstract

Climate change continues to pose threats to fisheries and fishery-dependent communities globally. Vulnerability to climate change is a function of exposure, sensitivity, and adaptive capacity. Sensitivity is largely determined by the differences in socio-economic conditions among communities, and conflicts over resources often exacerbate this sensitivity. This study aims to understand factors affecting the sensitivity to climate change. The objectives are twofold: first, to develop indicators affecting sensitivity and to determine how they affect sensitivity, second, to compare sensitivity of two small-scale fishing groups (fishing camps and fishing villages). The study used twelve indicators, which are categorized into two; the community characteristics and assets, and threats and conflicts. Results show that fishing camps are less sensitive to climate change than fishing villages since they have more varied livelihood sources, such as crop farming. This allows for more sources of income. Both groups experience conflict with other lake users and wildlife attacks, which amplify their sensitivity through the reduction of fishing grounds and the damaging of fishing gear. It also shows that both climate and non-climate factors affect sensitivity, and understanding this can help to increase adaptive capacity. The findings allow for formulation of policy recommendations to help strengthen the livelihoods of small-scale fisheries. View Full-Text
Keywords: climate change; communities; conflict; fisheries; households; Kariba; sensitivity; vulnerability; wildlife; Zimbabwe climate change; communities; conflict; fisheries; households; Kariba; sensitivity; vulnerability; wildlife; Zimbabwe
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Ndhlovu, N.; Saito, O.; Djalante, R.; Yagi, N. Assessing the Sensitivity of Small-Scale Fishery Groups to Climate Change in Lake Kariba, Zimbabwe. Sustainability 2017, 9, 2209.

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