Next Article in Journal
A Comparative Analysis of the Social Performance of Global and Local Berry Supply Chains
Previous Article in Journal
Dynamic Ecological Risk Assessment and Management of Land Use in the Middle Reaches of the Heihe River Based on Landscape Patterns and Spatial Statistics
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Sustainability 2016, 8(6), 538; doi:10.3390/su8060538

The Effects of Five Forms of Capital on Thought Processes Underlying Water Consumption Behavior in Suburban Vientiane

1
Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8505, Japan
2
Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8505, Japan
3
Faculty of Water Resources, National University of Laos, Ban Tadthong, Sikottabong District, Vientiane, Lao PDR
4
Soukphasith Survey-Design and Construction Sole Co., Ltd., Ban Nong Neing, Xaysetha District, Vientiane, Lao PDR
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Vincenzo Torretta
Received: 29 February 2016 / Revised: 11 May 2016 / Accepted: 1 June 2016 / Published: 6 June 2016
(This article belongs to the Section Sustainable Use of the Environment and Resources)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1830 KB, uploaded 6 June 2016]   |  

Abstract

A community’s water supply is one of its most important infrastructures, as sufficient quality and quantity of water are as much prerequisites for human life as economic development. The rapid urbanization predicted for developing countries will cause serious water shortages in densely populated areas. The Lao People’s Democratic Republic (PDR) is taking precautions by planning and developing their water supply infrastructure to ensure reliable supply of water. We used the five capitals model of sustainable livelihoods to capture how a household makes a living and analyzed the effects of five forms of capital (natural, physical, human, financial, and social) on water consumption behaviors from the perspective of the residents’ livelihood. We conducted a survey to gain an understanding of the thought processes behind water consumption behavior in two villages in suburban Vientiane. The results indicated that natural and physical capital delayed connections to the water supply. Financial capital stimulated the purchase of high-quality water in preference to a connection to the water supply. This lack of connection is not necessarily sustainable in the near future, considering ongoing urbanization. Furthermore, this possibility presents a difficult problem, as residents do not usually acknowledge it. To accomplish sustainable development goals, this gap should be overcome. View Full-Text
Keywords: five forms of capital; water supply; groundwater; domestic water; sustainable livelihood framework; Lao PDR five forms of capital; water supply; groundwater; domestic water; sustainable livelihood framework; Lao PDR
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Makino, T.; Noda, K.; Keokhamphui, K.; Hamada, H.; Oki, K.; Oki, T. The Effects of Five Forms of Capital on Thought Processes Underlying Water Consumption Behavior in Suburban Vientiane. Sustainability 2016, 8, 538.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Sustainability EISSN 2071-1050 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top