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Sustainability 2016, 8(1), 94; doi:10.3390/su8010094

Sequential Relationship between Profitability and Sustainability: The Case of Migratory Beekeeping

1
Department of Economics and Management, University of Trento, Via Inama 5, 38100 Trento, Italy
2
Department of Economic Sciences, Business, Mathematics and Statistics, University of Trieste, Via Valerio 4/1, 34127 Trieste, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Filippo Sgroi and Giuseppe Ioppolo
Received: 10 November 2015 / Revised: 8 January 2016 / Accepted: 12 January 2016 / Published: 19 January 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability and Competitiveness of Farms)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [189 KB, uploaded 19 January 2016]

Abstract

When beekeeping is managed on a migratory basis, the bee colony produces physical outputs (honey) and pollination services on a sequence of forage sites. Forage sites are competitors if their flowering periods overlap, and are complementary otherwise. Viable sequences consist only of complementary forage sites. A part of the bee colony’s production time is spent on each forage site in the period when the crop or wild vegetation covering it is in flower. The total period covered by the sequence of sites, including the base site, must be equal to or less than the duration (365 days) of the bee colony’s annual biological cycle. The migratory beekeeper draws up viable sequences of forage sites and calculates their profitability levels. Variations in the profitability of forage sites which alter the composition of the sequence, affecting provision of the non-marketed ecosystem pollination services, impact the biodiversity of the pollinated plants with trickle-down effects on sustainability. In the case of migratory beekeeping, there is, therefore, a sequential relationship between profitability and sustainability. View Full-Text
Keywords: migratory beekeeping; forage sites; sequential output production; ecosystem pollination services; modelling profitability and sustainability migratory beekeeping; forage sites; sequential output production; ecosystem pollination services; modelling profitability and sustainability
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Pilati, L.; Prestamburgo, M. Sequential Relationship between Profitability and Sustainability: The Case of Migratory Beekeeping. Sustainability 2016, 8, 94.

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