Next Article in Journal
The Textile Industry and Sustainable Development: A Holt–Winters Forecasting Investigation for the Eastern European Area
Next Article in Special Issue
Consumer Acceptance of Eco-Labeled Fish: A Mexican Case Study
Previous Article in Journal
Thermodynamic Analyses of Biomass Gasification Integrated Externally Fired, Post-Firing and Dual-Fuel Combined Cycles
Previous Article in Special Issue
Towards Marine Spatial Planning in Southern Taiwan
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Sustainability 2015, 7(2), 1263-1279; doi:10.3390/su7021263

Impact of Oceanographic Environmental Shifts and Atmospheric Events on the Sustainable Development of Coastal Aquaculture: A Case Study of Kelp and Scallops in Southern Hokkaido, Japan

1
Laboratory of Marine Environment and Resource Sensing, Faculty of Fisheries Sciences, Hokkaido University, 3-1-1 Minato, Hakodate, Hokkaido 041-8611, Japan
2
Graduate School of Maritime Sciences, Kobe University Research Laboratory for Tsunami and Marine Hazards, 5-1-1, Fukae-minami, Higashi-nada-ku, Kobe 658-0022, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Phoebe Koundouri
Received: 30 September 2014 / Revised: 13 January 2015 / Accepted: 15 January 2015 / Published: 26 January 2015
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [3647 KB, uploaded 24 February 2015]   |  

Abstract

We provide an overview of selected recent operational applications of satellite remote sensing and marine Geographic Information Systems (GIS) procedures to the practice of sustainable aquaculture in southern Hokkaido, Japan, focusing mainly on kelp and scallop aquaculture. We also developed a suitable aquaculture site-selection model (SASSM) for suspension culture of Gagome (a kelp species) in the same region. Models for Japanese kelp and Gagome showed that the distributions of the most suitable areas for both species overlapped. Competition between kelps was especially marked along the coastline between Hakodate and Esan. In addition, we examined the impact of oceanographic environmental changes and atmospheric events on scallop and kelp aquaculture sites, demonstrating that variations in the coastal Oyashio Current and the Tsugaru Warm Current significantly influenced the growth and harvesting seasons of scallops and kelps in Funka Bay and other sections of southern Hokkaido. Because a strong El Niño event occurred in 2010, January of that year was extremely cold. The proportion of suitable areas for both scallops and kelps during their respective growing seasons contracted in 2010. Thus, shifts in oceanographic and atmospheric conditions should be incorporated into sustainability management planning for coastal scallop and kelp aquaculture in southern Hokkaido. View Full-Text
Keywords: climate events; Gagome; Japanese kelp; Japanese scallop; suitable aquaculture site-selection model (SASSM) climate events; Gagome; Japanese kelp; Japanese scallop; suitable aquaculture site-selection model (SASSM)
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Liu, Y.; Saitoh, S.-I.; Nakada, S.; Zhang, X.; Hirawake, T. Impact of Oceanographic Environmental Shifts and Atmospheric Events on the Sustainable Development of Coastal Aquaculture: A Case Study of Kelp and Scallops in Southern Hokkaido, Japan. Sustainability 2015, 7, 1263-1279.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Sustainability EISSN 2071-1050 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top