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Sustainability 2015, 7(11), 15384-15399; doi:10.3390/su71115384

Evaluation of Biomass Yield and Water Treatment in Two Aquaponic Systems Using the Dynamic Root Floating Technique (DRF)

1
Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN-CINVESTAV, Km 6 Antigua Carretera a Progreso, C.P. 97310 Mérida, Mexico
2
Centro Regional Universitario de la Península de Yucatán, Universidad Autónoma Chapingo. Ex Hacienda Temozón Norte, C.P. 97310 Mérida, Mexico
3
Department of Soil Water and Environmental Science, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, The University of Arizona, P.O. Box 210038, Tucson, AZ 85721-0038, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Douglas H. Constance
Received: 4 August 2015 / Revised: 23 October 2015 / Accepted: 13 November 2015 / Published: 19 November 2015
(This article belongs to the Section Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Wildlife)
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Abstract

The experiment evaluates the food production and water treatment of TAN, NO2–N, NO3–N, and PO43− in two aquaponics systems using the dynamic root floating technique (DRF). A separate recirculation aquaculture system (RAS) was used as a control. The fish cultured was Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). The hydroponic culture in one treatment (PAK) was pak choy (Brassica chinensis,) and in the other (COR) coriander (Coriandrum sativum). Initial and final weights were determined for the fish culture. Final edible fresh weight was determined for the hydroponic plant culture. TAN, NO2–N, NO3–N, and PO43− were measured in fish culture and hydroponic culture once a week at two times, morning (9:00 a.m.) and afternoon (3:00 p.m.). The fish biomass production was not different in any treatment (p > 0.05) and the total plant yield was greater (p < 0.05) in PAK than in COR. For the hydroponic culture in the a.m., the PO43− was lower (p < 0.05) in the PAK treatment than in COR, and in the p.m. NO3–N and PO43− were lower (p < 0.05) in PAK than in COR. The PAK treatment demonstrated higher food production and water treatment efficiency than the other two treatments. View Full-Text
Keywords: aquaponics; sustainable aquaculture; wastewater treatment; integrated systems; Nile tilapia; pak choy; coriander aquaponics; sustainable aquaculture; wastewater treatment; integrated systems; Nile tilapia; pak choy; coriander
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Silva, L.; Gasca-Leyva, E.; Escalante, E.; Fitzsimmons, K.M.; Lozano, D.V. Evaluation of Biomass Yield and Water Treatment in Two Aquaponic Systems Using the Dynamic Root Floating Technique (DRF). Sustainability 2015, 7, 15384-15399.

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