Next Article in Journal
Urban and Rural MSW Stream Characterization for Separate Collection Improvement
Previous Article in Journal
Methodology for Assessing Daylighting Design Strategies in Classroom with a Climate-Based Method
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Sustainability 2015, 7(1), 898-915; doi:10.3390/su7010898

Effects of Climate Change on the Yield and Cropping Area of Major Food Crops: A Case of Bangladesh

1
College of Economics and Management, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, China
2
Department of Agronomy and Agricultural Extension, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi 6205, Bangladesh
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Giuseppe Ioppolo
Received: 10 November 2014 / Accepted: 8 January 2015 / Published: 14 January 2015
(This article belongs to the Section Economic, Business and Management Aspects of Sustainability)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [742 KB, uploaded 24 February 2015]   |  

Abstract

The crops that we grow for food need specific climatic conditions to show better performance in view of economic yield. A changing climate could have both beneficial and harmful effects on crops. Keeping the above view in mind, this study is undertaken to investigate the impacts of climate change (viz. changes in maximum temperature, minimum temperature, rainfall, humidity and sunshine) on the yield and cropping area of four major food crops (viz. Aus rice, Aman rice, Boro rice and wheat) in Bangladesh. Heteroskedasticity and autocorrelation consistent standard error (HAC) and feasible generalized least square (FGLS) methods were used to determine the climate-crop interrelations using national level time series data for the period of 1972–2010. Findings revealed that the effects of all the climate variables have had significant contributions to the yield and cropping area of major food crops with distinct variation among them. Maximum temperature statistically significantly affected all the food crops’ yield except Aus rice. Maximum temperature also insignificantly affected cropping area of all the crops. Minimum temperature insignificantly affected Aman rice but benefited other three crops’ yield and cropping area. Rainfall significantly benefitted cropping area of Aus rice, but significantly affected both yield and cropping area of Aman rice. Humidity statistically positively contributed to the yield of Aus and Aman rice but, statistically, negatively influenced the cropping area of Aus rice. Sunshine statistically significantly benefitted only Boro rice yield. Overall, maximum temperature adversely affected yield and cropping area of all the major food crops and rainfall severely affected Aman rice only. Concerning the issue of climate change and ensuring food security, the respective authorities thus should give considerable attention to the generation, development and extension of drought (all major food crops) and flood (particularly Aman rice) tolerant varieties. View Full-Text
Keywords: Bangladesh; climate change; yield and cropping area; major food crops; food security; drought; flood; sustainable agricultural development Bangladesh; climate change; yield and cropping area; major food crops; food security; drought; flood; sustainable agricultural development
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Amin, M.R.; Zhang, J.; Yang, M. Effects of Climate Change on the Yield and Cropping Area of Major Food Crops: A Case of Bangladesh. Sustainability 2015, 7, 898-915.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Sustainability EISSN 2071-1050 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top