Future Internet 2013, 5(3), 301-316; doi:10.3390/fi5030301
Article

Virtual Relationship Violence and Perspectives on Punishment: Do Gender or Nationality Matter?

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Received: 11 March 2013; in revised form: 17 May 2013 / Accepted: 6 June 2013 / Published: 26 June 2013
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inequality in the Digital Environment)
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract: Given the increasingly popular use of socially interactive technology (SIT), it is believed that the way in which individuals communicate and experience relationships has drastically been changing. For those who partake in this electronic world, damaging behaviors akin to those found in the real world have emerged. Yet, we know little about the extent of these behaviors in the context of romantic relationships, especially from a gender or cultural standpoint. Research on dating violence generally indicates that women experience in-person victimization at higher rates than men, although some research has called this into question. It also suggests that some national groups experience higher rates of violence than others. However, research is almost non-existent when it comes to exploring violence in the digital world. This study investigated gender and nationality in (1) the nature and extent of socially interactive intimate violence, and (2) perceptions of the seriousness of virtual relationship violence. Using a sample of students from the United States and Poland, findings revealed that socially interactive technology may serve as a new avenue for aggressing against partners, as virtual relationship violence was not uncommon and reflected some patterns present in the real world. Some unexpected patterns also emerged. The results of this research signal a possible transferability of covert intimate violence and highlight ways in which inequalities may exist in our virtual worlds.
Keywords: technology; text messaging; social networking; intimate partner violence; electronic victimization
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MDPI and ACS Style

Marganski, A. Virtual Relationship Violence and Perspectives on Punishment: Do Gender or Nationality Matter? Future Internet 2013, 5, 301-316.

AMA Style

Marganski A. Virtual Relationship Violence and Perspectives on Punishment: Do Gender or Nationality Matter? Future Internet. 2013; 5(3):301-316.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Marganski, Alison. 2013. "Virtual Relationship Violence and Perspectives on Punishment: Do Gender or Nationality Matter?" Future Internet 5, no. 3: 301-316.

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