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Viruses 2015, 7(12), 6661-6674; doi:10.3390/v7122964

A Flagellar Glycan-Specific Protein Encoded by Campylobacter Phages Inhibits Host Cell Growth

1
Alberta Glycomics Centre and Department of Biological Sciences, CW-405 Biological Sciences Building, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2E9, Canada
2
Saskatoon Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, 107 Science Place, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 0X2, Canada
3
Department of Medical Microbiology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, 6202 AZ Maastricht, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Rob Lavigne and Abram Aertsen
Received: 1 October 2015 / Revised: 24 November 2015 / Accepted: 8 December 2015 / Published: 16 December 2015
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Abstract

We previously characterized a carbohydrate binding protein, Gp047, derived from lytic Campylobacter phage NCTC 12673, as a promising diagnostic tool for the identification of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. We also demonstrated that this protein binds specifically to acetamidino-modified pseudaminic acid residues on host flagella, but the role of this protein in the phage lifecycle remains unknown. Here, we report that Gp047 is capable of inhibiting C. jejuni growth both on solid and liquid media, an activity, which we found to be bacteriostatic. The Gp047 domain responsible for bacterial growth inhibition is localized to the C-terminal quarter of the protein, and this activity is both contact- and dose-dependent. Gp047 gene homologues are present in all Campylobacter phages sequenced to date, and the resulting protein is not part of the phage particle. Therefore, these results suggest that either phages of this pathogen have evolved an effector protein capable of host-specific growth inhibition, or that Campylobacter cells have developed a mechanism of regulating their growth upon sensing an impending phage threat. View Full-Text
Keywords: Campylobacter; bacteriophage; receptor binding protein; growth inhibition; glycan binding protein; flagellar glycosylation; bacteriostatic Campylobacter; bacteriophage; receptor binding protein; growth inhibition; glycan binding protein; flagellar glycosylation; bacteriostatic
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Javed, M.A.; Sacher, J.C.; van Alphen, L.B.; Patry, R.T.; Szymanski, C.M. A Flagellar Glycan-Specific Protein Encoded by Campylobacter Phages Inhibits Host Cell Growth. Viruses 2015, 7, 6661-6674.

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