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Viruses 2014, 6(2), 428-447; doi:10.3390/v6020428

Passive Immunization against HIV/AIDS by Antibody Gene Transfer

1,* and 2,3,4
1
Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics, Eli & Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
2
Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089, USA
3
Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089, USA
4
Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 19 September 2013 / Revised: 6 January 2014 / Accepted: 10 January 2014 / Published: 27 January 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gene Therapy for Retroviral Infections)
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Abstract

Despite tremendous efforts over the course of many years, the quest for an effective HIV vaccine by the classical method of active immunization remains largely elusive. However, two recent studies in mice and macaques have now demonstrated a new strategy designated as Vectored ImmunoProphylaxis (VIP), which involves passive immunization by viral vector-mediated delivery of genes encoding broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) for in vivo expression. Robust protection against virus infection was observed in preclinical settings when animals were given VIP to express monoclonal neutralizing antibodies. This unorthodox approach raises new promise for combating the ongoing global HIV pandemic. In this article, we survey the status of antibody gene transfer, review the revolutionary progress on isolation of extremely bnAbs, detail VIP experiments against HIV and its related virus conduced in humanized mice and macaque monkeys, and discuss the pros and cons of VIP and its opportunities and challenges towards clinical applications to control HIV/AIDS endemics. View Full-Text
Keywords: antibody gene transfer; human immunodeficiency virus; vectored immunoprophylaxis; broadly neutralizing antibody; adeno-associated virus-based vectors antibody gene transfer; human immunodeficiency virus; vectored immunoprophylaxis; broadly neutralizing antibody; adeno-associated virus-based vectors
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).

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Yang, L.; Wang, P. Passive Immunization against HIV/AIDS by Antibody Gene Transfer. Viruses 2014, 6, 428-447.

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