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Materials 2015, 8(5), 2616-2634; doi:10.3390/ma8052616

Mechanical Properties and Cytocompatibility Improvement of Vertebroplasty PMMA Bone Cements by Incorporating Mineralized Collagen

1
Wendeng Orthopaedic Hospital, No. 1 Fengshan Road, Wendeng 264400, Shandong, China
2
Kangda College of Nanjing Medical University, No. 8 Chunhui Road, Xinhai District, Lianyungang 222000, Jiangsu, China
3
School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Haidian District, Beijing 100084, China
4
Beijing Allgens Medical Science and Technology Co., Ltd., No. 1 Disheng East Road, Yizhuang Economic and Technological Development Zone, Beijing 100176, China
5
Tianjin Hospital, No. 406 Jiefang South Road, Tianjin 300211, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Amir A. Zadpoor
Received: 15 March 2015 / Accepted: 5 May 2015 / Published: 13 May 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mechanics of Biomaterials)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [2523 KB, uploaded 13 May 2015]   |  

Abstract

Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) bone cement is a commonly used bone adhesive and filling material in percutaneous vertebroplasty and percutaneous kyphoplasty surgeries. However, PMMA bone cements have been reported to cause some severe complications, such as secondary fracture of adjacent vertebral bodies, and loosening or even dislodgement of the set PMMA bone cement, due to the over-high elastic modulus and poor osteointegration ability of the PMMA. In this study, mineralized collagen (MC) with biomimetic microstructure and good osteogenic activity was added to commercially available PMMA bone cement products, in order to improve both the mechanical properties and the cytocompatibility. As the compressive strength of the modified bone cements remained well, the compressive elastic modulus could be significantly down-regulated by the MC, so as to reduce the pressure on the adjacent vertebral bodies. Meanwhile, the adhesion and proliferation of pre-osteoblasts on the modified bone cements were improved compared with cells on those unmodified, such result is beneficial for a good osteointegration formation between the bone cement and the host bone tissue in clinical applications. Moreover, the modification of the PMMA bone cements by adding MC did not significantly influence the injectability and processing times of the cement. View Full-Text
Keywords: mineralized collagen; polymethyl methacrylate bone cement; vertebroplasty; compressive elastic modulus; cytocompatibility mineralized collagen; polymethyl methacrylate bone cement; vertebroplasty; compressive elastic modulus; cytocompatibility
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Jiang, H.-J.; Xu, J.; Qiu, Z.-Y.; Ma, X.-L.; Zhang, Z.-Q.; Tan, X.-X.; Cui, Y.; Cui, F.-Z. Mechanical Properties and Cytocompatibility Improvement of Vertebroplasty PMMA Bone Cements by Incorporating Mineralized Collagen. Materials 2015, 8, 2616-2634.

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