Materials 2013, 6(2), 669-681; doi:10.3390/ma6020669
Article

Supported Membranes Meet Flat Fluidics: Monitoring Dynamic Cell Adhesion on Pump-Free Microfluidics Chips Functionalized with Supported Membranes Displaying Mannose Domains

1 Department of Physics, Technical University Munich, Garching D85748, Germany 2 Experimental Physics I, University of Augsburg, Augsburg D86159, Germany 3 Physical Chemistry of Biosystems, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg D69120, Germany 4 NANO group-UMR 7565 SRSMC CNRS, Université de Lorraine, Boulevard des Aiguillettes-F54506 Vandoeuvre-Lès-Nancy, France 5 Beckman Coulter Biomedical GmbH, Advalytix Products, Munich D81377, Germany 6 Cell Biophysics Lab, Institute of Toxicology and Genetics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe D76131, Germany These two authors equally contributed to the work.
* Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 18 October 2012; in revised form: 7 January 2013 / Accepted: 5 February 2013 / Published: 22 February 2013
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Supported Lipid Membranes)
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Abstract: In this paper we demonstrate the combination of supported membranes and so-called flat microfluidics, which enables one to manipulate liquids on flat chip surfaces via “inverse piezoelectric effect”. Here, an alternating external electric field applied to the inter-digital transducers excites a surface acoustic wave on a piezoelectric substrate. Employing lithographic patterning of self-assembled monolayers of alkoxysilanes, we successfully confine a free-standing, hemi-cylindrical channel with the volume of merely 7 µL . The experimentally determined maximum flow velocity scales linearly with the acoustic power, suggesting that our current setup can drive liquids at the speed of up to 7 cm/s (corresponding to a shear rate of 280 s−1) without applying high pressures using a fluidic pump. After the establishment of the functionalization of fluidic chip surfaces with supported membranes, we deposited asymmetric supported membranes displaying well-defined mannose domains and monitored the dynamic adhesion of E. Coli HB101 expressing mannose-binding receptors. Despite of the further technical optimization required for the quantitative analysis, the obtained results demonstrate that the combination of supported membranes and flat fluidics opens a large potential to investigate dynamic adhesion of cells on biofunctional membrane surfaces with the minimum amount of samples, without any fluidic pump.
Keywords: supported membrane; surface acoustic wave; flatfluidics; cell adhesion

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MDPI and ACS Style

Oelke, J.; Kaindl, T.; Pasc, A.; Guttenberg, Z.; Wixforth, A.; Tanaka, M. Supported Membranes Meet Flat Fluidics: Monitoring Dynamic Cell Adhesion on Pump-Free Microfluidics Chips Functionalized with Supported Membranes Displaying Mannose Domains. Materials 2013, 6, 669-681.

AMA Style

Oelke J, Kaindl T, Pasc A, Guttenberg Z, Wixforth A, Tanaka M. Supported Membranes Meet Flat Fluidics: Monitoring Dynamic Cell Adhesion on Pump-Free Microfluidics Chips Functionalized with Supported Membranes Displaying Mannose Domains. Materials. 2013; 6(2):669-681.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Oelke, Jochen; Kaindl, Thomas; Pasc, Andreea; Guttenberg, Zeno; Wixforth, Achim; Tanaka, Motomu. 2013. "Supported Membranes Meet Flat Fluidics: Monitoring Dynamic Cell Adhesion on Pump-Free Microfluidics Chips Functionalized with Supported Membranes Displaying Mannose Domains." Materials 6, no. 2: 669-681.

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