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Materials 2017, 10(7), 817; doi:10.3390/ma10070817

Study of the Technical Feasibility of Increasing the Amount of Recycled Concrete Waste Used in Ready-Mix Concrete Production

1
SCoDIP Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of La Rioja, 26004 Logroño, Spain
2
GI-TENECO Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of La Rioja, 26004 Logroño, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 12 April 2017 / Revised: 12 July 2017 / Accepted: 14 July 2017 / Published: 18 July 2017
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Abstract

The construction industry generates a considerable amount of waste. Faced with this undesirable situation, the ready-mix concrete sector, in particular, has invested energy and resources into reusing its own waste in its production process as it works towards the goal of more sustainable construction. This study examines the feasibility of incorporating two types of concrete waste, which currently end up in landfill, into the production process of ready-mix concrete: the waste generated during the initial production stage (ready-mix concrete waste), and waste created when demolition waste is treated to obtain artificial aggregate. The first phase of the study’s methodology corroborates the suitability of the recycled aggregate through characterization tests. After this phase, the impact of incorporating different percentages of recycled coarse aggregate is evaluated by examining the performance of the produced concrete. The replacement rate varied between 15% and 50%. The results indicate that recycled aggregates are, indeed, suitable to be incorporated into ready-mix concrete production. The impact on the final product’s performance is different for the two cases examined herein. Incorporating aggregates from generic concrete blocks led to a 20% decrease in the produced concrete’s strength performance. On the other hand, using recycled aggregates made from the demolition waste led to a smaller decrease in the concrete’s performance: about 8%. The results indicate that with adequate management and prior treatment, the waste from these plants can be re-incorporated into their production processes. If concrete waste is re-used, concrete production, in general, becomes more sustainable for two reasons: less waste ends up as landfill and the consumption of natural aggregates is also reduced. View Full-Text
Keywords: concrete; ready-mixed concrete; aggregate; recycled concrete waste; recycled concrete; ready-mixed concrete; aggregate; recycled concrete waste; recycled
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Fraile-Garcia, E.; Ferreiro-Cabello, J.; López-Ochoa, L.M.; López-González, L.M. Study of the Technical Feasibility of Increasing the Amount of Recycled Concrete Waste Used in Ready-Mix Concrete Production. Materials 2017, 10, 817.

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