Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2011, 8(9), 3591-3608; doi:10.3390/ijerph8093591
Article

Self-Reported Exposure to Policy and Environmental Influences on Smoking Cessation and Relapse: A 2-Year Longitudinal Population-based Study

Received: 27 July 2011; Accepted: 25 August 2011 / Published: 5 September 2011
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tobacco Smoking: Public Health, Science and Policy)
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract: Although most smokers want to quit, the long-term success rate of quit attempts remains low; research is needed to understand the policy and environmental influences that can increase the success of cessation efforts. This paper uses regression methods to investigate self-reported exposure to policy and environmental influences on quit attempts, maintenance of a quit attempt for at least 6 months, and relapse in a longitudinal population-based sample, the New York Adult Cohort Survey, followed for 12 months (N = 3,261) and 24 months (N = 1,142). When policy or environmental influence variables were assessed independently of other policy or environmental influence variables, many were significant for at least some of the cessation outcomes. In the full models that included a full set of policy or environmental influence variables, many significant associations became nonsignificant. A number of policies may have an influence on multiple cessation outcomes. However, the effect varies by cessation outcome, and statistical significance is influenced by model specification.
Keywords: smoking cessation; nicotine replacement therapy; home smoking bans; quitlines; smoking cessation ads
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MDPI and ACS Style

Nonnemaker, J.; Hersey, J.; Homsi, G.; Busey, A.; Hyland, A.; Juster, H.; Farrelly, M. Self-Reported Exposure to Policy and Environmental Influences on Smoking Cessation and Relapse: A 2-Year Longitudinal Population-based Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2011, 8, 3591-3608.

AMA Style

Nonnemaker J, Hersey J, Homsi G, Busey A, Hyland A, Juster H, Farrelly M. Self-Reported Exposure to Policy and Environmental Influences on Smoking Cessation and Relapse: A 2-Year Longitudinal Population-based Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2011; 8(9):3591-3608.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Nonnemaker, James; Hersey, James; Homsi, Ghada; Busey, Andrew; Hyland, Andrew; Juster, Harlan; Farrelly, Matthew. 2011. "Self-Reported Exposure to Policy and Environmental Influences on Smoking Cessation and Relapse: A 2-Year Longitudinal Population-based Study." Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 8, no. 9: 3591-3608.

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