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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2009, 6(5), 1539-1556; doi:10.3390/ijerph6051539

The Potential Impact on Farmer Health of Enhanced Export Horticultural Trade between the U.K. and Uganda

1
School of the Environment and Natural Resources, Deiniol Road, Bangor University, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW, U.K.
2
Centre for Economics and Policy in Health, Institute of Medical and Social Care Research, Dean Street Building, Bangor University, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 1UT, U.K.
3
Department of Forest Biology and Ecosystems Management, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7062, Kampala, Uganda
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 16 January 2009 / Accepted: 21 April 2009 / Published: 28 April 2009
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability: Environmental Studies and Public Health)
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Abstract

The export of vegetables from African countries to European markets presents consumers with an ethical dilemma: should they support local, but relatively well-off farmers, or poorer farmers from distant countries? This paper considers the issue of farm worker health in the U.K. and Uganda, and considers the dilemma facing U.K. consumers if Uganda achieves their aim of exporting more vegetables to the U.K. Self-reported health scores of 1,200 farm workers in the U.K. and Uganda were measured with the internationally recognised SF-36 questionnaire and compared to an international population norm. The age-corrected health status of U.K. farm workers was significantly lower than the population norm, whereas Ugandans scored significantly higher (indicating good health) for physical health and lower for mental health. If Ugandan produce enters U.K. markets, then consumers may wish to consider both the potential benefits that enhanced trade could offer Ugandan farmers compared with its impacts on U.K. workers. View Full-Text
Keywords: Health; malaria; migrant; vegetable production; Europe; Africa Health; malaria; migrant; vegetable production; Europe; Africa
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Cross, P.; Edwards, R.T.; Nyeko, P.; Edwards-Jones, G. The Potential Impact on Farmer Health of Enhanced Export Horticultural Trade between the U.K. and Uganda. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2009, 6, 1539-1556.

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