Next Article in Journal
Work-Family Conflict, Perceived Organizational Support and Professional Commitment: A Mediation Mechanism for Chinese Project Professionals
Previous Article in Journal
Shared Housing Arrangements in Germany—An Equitable Alternative to Long Term Care Services beyond Homes and Institutions?
Article Menu
Issue 2 (February) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(2), 343; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15020343

Physical Health Care for People with Severe Mental Illness: the Attitudes, Practices, and Training Needs of Nurses in Three Asian Countries

1
School of Nursing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China
2
Health Services and Population Research Centre, Hamad Medical Corporation, PO Box 3050, Doha, Qatar
3
Department of Nursing, Okayama Prefectural University, 111 Kuboki, Soja, Okayama 719-1197, Japan
4
Mental Health Services, Hamad Medical Corporation, PO Box 3050, Doha, Qatar
5
Department of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria 3086, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 8 January 2018 / Revised: 2 February 2018 / Accepted: 12 February 2018 / Published: 15 February 2018
(This article belongs to the Section Health Services and Health Economics Research)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [311 KB, uploaded 22 February 2018]

Abstract

People with severe mental illness (SMI) have considerable unmet physical health needs and an increased risk of early mortality. This cross-sectional survey utilized the Physical Health Attitude Scale (PHASe) to examine the attitudes, practices, and training needs of nurses towards physical health care of people with SMI in three Asian countries (Hong Kong, Japan, Qatar). Cross-country differences were explored and linear regression was used to investigate if nurses’ attitudes and confidence were associated with their level of involvement in physical health care. A total of 481 questionnaires were returned. Hong Kong nurses were less involved in physical health care than those from Japan and Qatar. Nurses’ attitudes and confidence were significant predictors of their participation in managing physical health. Compared with western countries, more nurses in this study felt that mental illness was a barrier to improving physical health. Three-quarters reported that they needed additional training in promoting cardiometabolic health. The perceived need for additional training in physical health care was held by Mental Health Nurses (MHN) irrespective of their type of nursing registration and nationality. Nurse educators and service providers should reconsider the physical health care training requirements of nurses working in mental health settings in order to improve the physical health of people with SMI. View Full-Text
Keywords: nurse attitudes; physical health care; severe mental illness; nurse education nurse attitudes; physical health care; severe mental illness; nurse education
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Bressington, D.; Badnapurkar, A.; Inoue, S.; Ma, H.Y.; Chien, W.T.; Nelson, D.; Gray, R. Physical Health Care for People with Severe Mental Illness: the Attitudes, Practices, and Training Needs of Nurses in Three Asian Countries. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 343.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top