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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(9), 986; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14090986

Identification of Potential High-Risk Habitats within the Transmission Reach of Oncomelania hupensis after Floods Based on SAR Techniques in a Plane Region in China

1
Key Laboratory of Monitoring and Estimate for Environment and Disaster of Hubei Province, Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430077, China
2
University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 22 June 2017 / Revised: 4 August 2017 / Accepted: 24 August 2017 / Published: 30 August 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Hazards and Public Health: A Systems Approach)
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Abstract

Schistosomiasis japonica is an infectious disease caused by Schistosoma japonicum, and it remains endemic in China. Flooding is the main hazard factor, as it causes the spread of Oncomelania hupensis, the only intermediate host of Schistosoma japonicum, thereby triggering schistosomiasis outbreaks. Based on multi-source real-time remote sensing data, we used remote sensing (RS) technology, especially synthetic aperture radar (SAR), and geographic information system (GIS) techniques to carry out warning research on potential snail habitats within the snail dispersal range following flooding. Our research result demonstrated: (1) SAR data from Sentinel-1A before and during a flood were used to identify submerged areas rapidly and effectively; (2) the likelihood of snail survival was positively correlated with the clay proportion, core area standard deviation, and ditch length but negatively correlated with the wetness index, NDVI (normalized difference vegetation index), elevation, woodland area, and construction land area; (3) the snail habitats were most abundant near rivers and ditches in paddy fields; (4) the rivers and paddy irrigation ditches in the submerged areas must be the focused of mitigation efforts following future floods. View Full-Text
Keywords: schistosomiasis; Oncomelania hupensis; flooding; SAR; dispersal range; snail habitats schistosomiasis; Oncomelania hupensis; flooding; SAR; dispersal range; snail habitats
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Shi, Y.; Qiu, J.; Li, R.; Shen, Q.; Huang, D. Identification of Potential High-Risk Habitats within the Transmission Reach of Oncomelania hupensis after Floods Based on SAR Techniques in a Plane Region in China. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 986.

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